There's an App for that...

There's an app for that, is there? Well, strike me blind. Let's all go 'ooooohhh' in hushed tones, and pull out our phones, and search it up...

Is there anything there isn't an app for, at this point in time?
(I just checked, and there are several for tracking/recording/rating/reporting your bowel movements, so maybe not...)

What drives the unquestioning adoption, the semi-worship, even, of anything wrapped in a veneer of 'technological'? Why is there an implicit assumption, that if there is an app for something, you are the poorer for not installing it? That if there exists a Facebook group around some interest, you are the poorer for not joining it? That if it is possible to collect, aggregate, upload, and share bog-loads of unfiltered descriptive data on every conceivable subject known to mankind, and then some, that it is automatically desirable to do so?

Or am I the weird one, here?
«1

Comments

  • Simon ToadSimon Toad Shipmate
    edited December 6
    I use my smart phone daily, but only because I like sharing my unfiltered thoughts with my friends and family, and trolling like a beast on news sites. It's good for using as a map if I need to find a specific address, and as an alternative to the desktop when I am away. I can also look things up straight away at work, where I don't have a computer. I use it to muck around with clients or plan trips out with them. I'm trying to get one client in particular to try new types of entertainment, and being able to dial up, say, ballet on ice on You-tube is very useful to ensure i don't waste her money.

    I don't have a need to record my bowel movements, but some people do. At work we have sheets to record people's bowel movements if they are on some sort of treatment to assist their motions. We otherwise only record them if there is a medical need and the Dr wants us to. Paper/smart phone - I say meh. I'd like to see the company who makes Metamucil get caught hacking people's bowel records to target their advertising. That would be a major cackfest.

    (edited to remove ageist slur)
  • I'm not a "get an app for everything" person, and I don't have a smartphone. But some reasons I can think of:

    --Makes life easier (or seems to).

    --Can quickly do all sorts of medical tracking, and send it off to whomever.

    --Feeling popular, because you're using something that's popular.

    --Keeping up with trends.

    --Getting sucked in by advertising.

    If I do get a smartphone at some point, I probably will want to add apps for some things. Maybe medical tracking, fun things, calming and relaxing tools. But the privacy aspect would be a concern.

    FWIW.



  • A Feminine ForceA Feminine Force Shipmate
    edited December 6
    I just got a semi-smartphone (android OS but no data plan, just calling and texting).

    I have to say it is NOT better than a regular phone.

    When I had a regular phone, I would hear it ring and pick it up on whatever floor I happened to be on.

    Now I have to remember to bring the damn thing with me every time I go up or downstairs. I am expecting a call and then I hear it ringing two floors away and I'm like Hugh Grant in that scene in Four Weddings and a Funeral with all the expletives running up two flights of stairs.

    Then there's my voicemail which forgets my password setting.

    Then there's the ubiquitous texts from the neediest people of my acquaintance, who happen to also be the people I care least about.

    "Hey you there?"

    "Hey"

    "Hey"

    "Are you ignoring me?"

    Why yes. Yes I am. Because I happen to be paying attention to something vastly more important than your need for attention at this very second. Like driving. And having a conversation with my Beloved.

    And why you think I am just sitting around with nothing better to do than drop everything and answer your text is a mystery to me because we are BOTH old enough to remember the days when you called, got my answering machine, and left a message. And then, when it was a good time for me, I would call you back.

    Ugh. I am not enjoying this particular feature of the 21st century.

    AFF



  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    It's all in how you use it vs. how it uses you.

    If I don't recognize a call via caller ID, I reject the call. I **never** answer such calls.

    If I do recognize a call, I answer it if I feel like it, otherwise it goes into voice mail.

    Ditto re text messages.

    As for apps other than those pre-installed on the phone, I have downloaded (because I find them useful):
    • Flashlight
    • Piano keyboard
    • Metronome
    • Pitch pipe
    • QR code reader
    • Compass
  • anoesis wrote: »
    There's an app for that, is there? Well, strike me blind. Let's all go 'ooooohhh' in hushed tones, and pull out our phones, and search it up...

    Is there anything there isn't an app for, at this point in time?
    (I just checked, and there are several for tracking/recording/rating/reporting your bowel movements, so maybe not...)

    What drives the unquestioning adoption, the semi-worship, even, of anything wrapped in a veneer of 'technological'? Why is there an implicit assumption, that if there is an app for something, you are the poorer for not installing it? That if there exists a Facebook group around some interest, you are the poorer for not joining it? That if it is possible to collect, aggregate, upload, and share bog-loads of unfiltered descriptive data on every conceivable subject known to mankind, and then some, that it is automatically desirable to do so?
    I've a smartphone and use the hell out of it. But I hate social media. My mobile is primarily a tool. I think it has changed our interactions, some for the better, some not so much. I don't like how it interrupts social encounters, though.
    Or am I the weird one, here?
    I am hardly the one to judge that.

  • It's all in how you use it vs. how it uses you.
    I think that should be the goal, but it isn't necessarily that easy. Because one can communicate, schedule, reference, etc. right now, it can be expected. The smartphone has literally changed the way people do business. To not utilise one can actually be detrimental. A Luddite friend of mine finally was moved to text as that was the way he got new jobs. If his corner of his industry weren't so tiny, he'd likely have to use facebook too. And whilst social media can trip one up, a lack of presence can be deemed sketchy as well.

  • anoesisanoesis Shipmate
    The immediate frustration behind this rant, for me, is that I live near a gully, which is (as you'd expect) crawling with furred vermin of various kinds. One of my neighbours suggested that we mount a street-wide trapping effort to get numbers down, and help the birds out. I was all in. But now, when we meet up, it's all, 'Did you know, you can get an app, for your phone, and all you have to do is push a button, while you're standing at the trap, and select 1 or 0, and it records your kill, and it's location?" [Ooooh...] and, 'Did you know, there's a website you can join, and upload data of what you've caught, and when, and it'll graph it for you?' [Ooooh...], and 'Did you know, you can get traps that keep a record of how many times the spring has been set off?' [I - don't - freaking - care.] Technology is not needed, in this instance, and in my opinion, data really isn't, either. I can see the usefulness of collecting data if you're the Department of Conservation, or something, and trying to justify your budgets, or trying to work out when's a good time to re-introduce some precarious species to an area, but, honestly? We're just trying to catch some rats and stoats. For which you need a TRAP, not an APP.
  • anoesisanoesis Shipmate
    Golden Key wrote: »
    I'm not a "get an app for everything" person, and I don't have a smartphone. But some reasons I can think of:

    --Makes life easier (or seems to).

    --Can quickly do all sorts of medical tracking, and send it off to whomever.

    I think your inclusion of (or seems to) is extremely pertinent. I suspect it's very easy to get caught up in the minutiae of a topic, if you're being continually fed minutiae.

    It's also worth noting, on the topic of 'smart' medical technology,* that you'll only get an accurate, useful, result, from a machine that's regularly and adequately tested and calibrated. It's problematic if every man and his dog has access to technology that's precise, but not necessarily accurate, without the means to adequately interpret it. A couple of cases spring to mind:

    My eldest child, at her yearly monitoring check-up (for minor ongoing condition) - always they take a full set of a measurements - height, weight, blood pressure, reflexes, even though none except height are in the least bit relevant. They use these fully automatic blood pressure machines with self-inflating cuffs and a digital read-out. What happened last time, was, the first three times the nurse applied it, it spat out a blood pressure reading that was, shall we say, unlikely for an otherwise healthy child. Each time, she would tut, and re-set it, and try again. Finally, it gave a reading that was within the range you might expect, for the patient she was dealing with, so she wrote those numbers down. The whole thing was an exercise in futility - the machine was clearly faulty**, and the human using it had considerably more nous. In our instance, it didn't matter - but what about when it was put to use on someone who did have blood pressure issues?

    My youngest child, some years ago, had fairly regular severe asthma attacks, which we were not able to manage at home. We would take him to the after-hours clinic, where someone would attach a blood-oxygen monitor to his finger or thumb and watch for the read-out. Usually it would indicate 90-91, at first, and the nurse would say, 'That'll go up in a bit,' and wait. When it didn't, instead of concluding that his blood oxygen levels were problematically low, they'd have us take off his shoes, and attach the thing to a big toe instead. Bingo - you'd get 93-94, which is still less than ideal, but not let's-go-to-hospital stuff. Once again, you have medical staff trying other ways of bludgeoning their equipment into saying the right thing, because they already know, just from looking at your child, that he's not as sick as the equipment's trying to tell them. And the one time we did take him in there with pallor and sweating, they didn't bother attaching anything to him, they just called an ambulance.
    - - -
    *I'm obviously veering away from specifically app-based things, here
    ** And had a sticker on it, indicating a service date which was six months elapsed by that point.
  • anoesisanoesis Shipmate

    Then there's the ubiquitous texts [snip]

    "Hey you there?"

    "Hey"

    "Hey"

    "Are you ignoring me?"

    [Texts from my mother.]

    "I sent you an email."

    "Did you get my email?"

    "Why haven't you answered my email?"

    [sighs, reminds self to check email when home - as that's one thing I really don't want on my phone. Checks email, finds random screed about how good the weather's been and how nice the beach was today, and cheese is on special at the supermarket.]
  • finelinefineline Purgatory Host
    I’ve not come across any assumption that if there is an app for something, you’re the poorer for not installing it. It seems more that if there’s an app for something, there are likely to be people who will want it and find it useful, so it’s worth mentioning to people if there’s a relevant app, even though most will scoff.

    I actually find scoffing to be the more usual reaction! People sometimes making fun of the things I have apps for, making snarky comments like ‘However did people manage before smartphones?!’ And I tell them in my case, seriously, not so well, because I struggle a lot with organisation, and apps can help. Things that track and make graphs are really useful for me. Though in my experience most people don’t use them or find them helpful.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    edited December 6
    If you are lost in an unknown town in Tuscany (for example) - the google maps app walking directions is a boon.

    We often go off piste on holiday walking or on bikes - it has saved acres of time and faffing.
  • finelinefineline Purgatory Host
    Or if you have no sense of direction, like me, the google maps app is helpful even navigating your own hometown! Seriously - I use it all the time, and it has made such a difference to my confidence going to parts of town I'm not so familiar with. And it helps me know when to get off the bus, so I don't have to ask the driver. Though occasionally it has misdirected me to the middle of nowhere, but that is very rare.
  • Schroedingers CatSchroedingers Cat Shipmate, Waving not Drowning Host, 8th Day Host
    I like using my phone - I can check my email at work, find where I am and where I am going (at least physically - in terms of my life journey, that is far harder, although there is probably an app for that).

    I do like downloading apps where they are relevant and appropriate. It is really great to be able to use the features of the device - I have half a dozen I have downloaded on there. A sky map, because I don't know the stars well enough, that sort of thing.

    The truth is, they make life easier. But they are not life. There is not always an app for it. There is often an app to distract you from it.
  • I sometimes find smart technology tiring, but there's a nap for that
  • chrisstileschrisstiles Shipmate
    edited December 6
    On the prosaic - I use a smartphone - I listen to podcasts and streamed music when I'm commuting and when I need to travel for work. It's handy to be able to communicate with most of my immediate and extended family with things like WhatsApp, and it's good to be able to see people with FaceTime, Skype etc.

    I do have my phone on silent for much of the time - and have virtually all notifications turned off. I try to deliberately detach from technology at the end of the day so that I don't end up in that really low energy state of getting constant stimulation by browsing at random on topics I wouldn't normally be interested in. I'm increasingly detached from any kind of social media/platform.

    I think information hoarding can be a real thing - one of my relatives has a habit of buying and collecting books beyond his ability to ever read them in a single lifetime - but then he has always valued books and grew up in a milieu in which it was hard to find the books he wanted to read. I think similarly the relative abundance of information is a new thing for most people, and while it brings many benefits we can get addicted to hoarding/linking/clicking it for its own sake - humorously illustrated in the xkcd cartoon below:

    https://www.xkcd.com/214/

    Additionally, the ability to check things (be it email, information, etc) can be a large cause of anxiety.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Couldn't function without. Would forget everything I'm meant to be doing.

    I just arrived at Leeds station. As the train pulled in I was able to check when the onward train to Bradford left and from what platform. Way less stressful than making sense of the departures board which is very busy and keeps on changing just as you hone in on it, while people tut at you as you look at it for being in their way. Massive improvement for me. Similarly when I'm ready to return I can easily check the time of the next train.

    I remember the old ways. They didn't work well for me.
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    edited December 6
    Boogie wrote: »
    If you are lost in an unknown town in Tuscany (for example) - the google maps app walking directions is a boon.
    I once got lost in an Alsatian village, before smartphones existed. A beautiful girl saw me, and asked if I was in need of a glass of wine.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    Boogie wrote: »
    If you are lost in an unknown town in Tuscany (for example) - the google maps app walking directions is a boon.

    We often go off piste on holiday walking or on bikes - it has saved acres of time and faffing.

    Before Google Maps, when on holiday in a coastal area and lost the plan was always head downhill until you find the coast, then along the coast to somewhere you recognise.

    Even walking in the Scotish mountains head towards the loch then turn left has seen me find my way again.

    I have used Google Maps, it was convenient, but never needed.
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Couldn't function without. Would forget everything I'm meant to be doing.

    I just arrived at Leeds station. As the train pulled in I was able to check when the onward train to Bradford left and from what platform. Way less stressful than making sense of the departures board which is very busy and keeps on changing just as you hone in on it, while people tut at you as you look at it for being in their way. Massive improvement for me. Similarly when I'm ready to return I can easily check the time of the next train.

    I remember the old ways. They didn't work well for me.

    I commuted through Leeds station for four and a half years. I feel your pain.

    The app is useless at Leeds.

    If you want Northern, Cross Country and/or whoever is running the London route then it sort of worked, if you wanted info from TransPennineExcuse, forget it. (It was TransPennine's app).
  • CrœsosCrœsos Shipmate
    edited December 6
    Smartphones have reduced or eliminated what were formerly common annoyances, like getting lost, missing meet ups because you're at the wrong place, or waiting for someone who's late without any way of knowing if they're late or just not showing up. McSweeney's did a brief bit on Stories That Would Have Turned Out Differently If the Protagonists Had Had Cell Phones.

    On the other hand apps are sometimes oversold in what they can accomplish, much the same way the internet was oversold in the late 1990s or computers in the 1980s. Yes, they changed a lot of things, but to a lot of the general public at the time these were magic black boxes that could do anything!
    They couldn't

    Here's one example a lot of folks are familiar with.
    Uber is a taxi company with an app attached. It bears almost no resemblance to internet superstars it claims to emulate. The app is not technically daunting and and does not create a competitive barrier, as witnessed by the fact that many other players have copied it. Apps have been introduced for airlines, pizza delivery, and hundreds of other consumer services but have never generated market-share gains, much less tens of billions in corporate value. They do not create network effects. Unlike Facebook or eBay, having more Uber users does not improve the service.

    The article goes on to list a whole bunch of reasons to believe that Uber is not capable of success in the long-term, or even the medium-term, but a lot of it boils down to people saying "an otherwise unsustainable business model will work if we deploy it through an app!"
  • GwaiGwai Purgatory Host
    I think it's partially our modern way of life and not the phones that are the problem. Why do I think this? Because I refuse to have a cell phone--I share one with my husband and call it our house phone--and I still feel I have to fight off the same problems everyone mentions here. People still expect instant responses for me, etc. We use technology heavily because it's so useful but we have not yet learned how to make space for ourselves.
  • Gwai wrote: »
    I think it's partially our modern way of life and not the phones that are the problem.
    The mobile phone has helped create that modern way of life. You are expected to respond immediately because everyone has a mobile, even when you don't actually have one.
    A friend of mine who is in a freelance industry had to get a mobile initially because if he waited to retrieve a message from his home machine, he would miss jobs. Then he had to go to texts because that is how jobs were sent. He has to remain on social media because networking is also a factor. Whilst some can insulate themselves, this is becoming more difficult. It has always been thus. Stone to steel to motorised transport to mobile phones.

  • Do you use the app or does the app use you?

    It's a serious question. I installed an app called Blokada from a secondary repository (F-droid) on an Android phone. In 2 months it blocked app secondary trackers 78,000 times. Most common of these are to something google or something facebook, and frequently instagram. All of these came as shovel-ware* on to the phone when I got it and I've never used any of the apps which phone home. If the apps phone home this often, I think they are using the people. You use apps, apps use you, use you apps, use apps you.

    This noted, we use an app for my office computer server such that when logging in, you must click yes on the phone or the computer will not log into the server. Which is called two-factor identification and is required for sensitive personal information and well as restraint of the evil hackers.


    "shovel-ware. The program is shovelled into the phone like so much sh**.
  • anoesis wrote: »
    It's also worth noting, on the topic of 'smart' medical technology,* that you'll only get an accurate, useful, result, from a machine that's regularly and adequately tested and calibrated. It's problematic if every man and his dog has access to technology that's precise, but not necessarily accurate, without the means to adequately interpret it.
    Knowing how to properly use a tool and properly read a patients symptoms has always been an issue. Over-reliance on technology is an issue, but i'd wager technology has saved far more lives by its existence than lost by its misuse. A larger problem with the medical industry is playing the odds. Big problems get misdiagnosed because they mimic more common but more innocuous smaller issues.
  • Boogie wrote: »
    If you are lost in an unknown town in Tuscany (for example) - the google maps app walking directions is a boon.

    We often go off piste on holiday walking or on bikes - it has saved acres of time and faffing.
    Here is the confluence of helpful and dangerous. Google maps isn't always correct and doesn't know a {relatively} safe area from a not so safe one. IMO and IME, it is better to have a general understanding of where one is going and use mobile mapping as an additional tool.
  • Crœsos wrote: »
    On the other hand apps are sometimes oversold in what they can accomplish, much the same way the internet was oversold in the late 1990s or computers in the 1980s. Yes, they changed a lot of things

    Yes, and in many ways the knock on effects of the things they change have been less glitzy and ultimately more pervasive (see lots of the threads on this board at this minute for evidence of that).

    There is also a fair amount of silicon steampunk - business processes with computing/internet/apps inserted in a higgledy-piggledy manner somewhere in the middle. As well as regulatory plays like Uber, Deliveroo, Airbnb etc.
  • GwaiGwai Purgatory Host
    lilbuddha wrote: »
    Gwai wrote: »
    I think it's partially our modern way of life and not the phones that are the problem.
    The mobile phone has helped create that modern way of life. You are expected to respond immediately because everyone has a mobile, even when you don't actually have one.
    A friend of mine who is in a freelance industry had to get a mobile initially because if he waited to retrieve a message from his home machine, he would miss jobs. Then he had to go to texts because that is how jobs were sent. He has to remain on social media because networking is also a factor. Whilst some can insulate themselves, this is becoming more difficult. It has always been thus. Stone to steel to motorised transport to mobile phones.

    Completely agreed re modern way of life caused by phones. But now it's universal. I had a conversation yesterday where a boss and I agreed we would of course do work over our vacation. And she at least is taking time off work to be not working--I'm a freelancer/independent business person, so to be fair I'm not--but there she is knowing that she will of course be working. She'll take a laptop with her just to work I betcha anything.
  • lilbuddha wrote: »
    Boogie wrote: »
    If you are lost in an unknown town in Tuscany (for example) - the google maps app walking directions is a boon.

    We often go off piste on holiday walking or on bikes - it has saved acres of time and faffing.
    Here is the confluence of helpful and dangerous. Google maps isn't always correct and doesn't know a {relatively} safe area from a not so safe one. IMO and IME, it is better to have a general understanding of where one is going and use mobile mapping as an additional tool.
    I have a handheld GPS made for slow travel (bike, hike, canoe). The map sets vary quite a bit. Google isn't one I use very much which is oriented toward streets and businesses. I prefer to switch back and forth between topographic and towns if travelling. I don't like the google location features from their maps which try to then decide what adverts to shovel at you because it flogs the data of your location to every other app on your phone if it can.

    It is possible to feed google maps wrong location info (Fake Traveler is a good open source app for this).
  • lilbuddha wrote: »
    anoesis wrote: »
    It's also worth noting, on the topic of 'smart' medical technology,* that you'll only get an accurate, useful, result, from a machine that's regularly and adequately tested and calibrated. It's problematic if every man and his dog has access to technology that's precise, but not necessarily accurate, without the means to adequately interpret it.
    Knowing how to properly use a tool and properly read a patients symptoms has always been an issue. Over-reliance on technology is an issue, but i'd wager technology has saved far more lives by its existence than lost by its misuse. A larger problem with the medical industry is playing the odds. Big problems get misdiagnosed because they mimic more common but more innocuous smaller issues.

    Well yes, perhaps.

    But then there's this.

    https://hub.jhu.edu/2016/05/03/medical-errors-third-leading-cause-of-death/

    So it's hard to perceive just what role technology plays in iatrogenic mortality.

    AFF

  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    edited December 6
    The simplest app - if it is an app - I use is the timer on my iPad.

    When I sit down for my breakfast I browse the web for quarter of an hour, then do my German practice (using the Rosetta Stone app, which is marvellous, interactive and helps my poor, slow brain to learn) for half an hour, then I log off and get on with RL.

    The timer keeps me on track :mrgreen:
  • Well yes, perhaps.

    But then there's this.

    https://hub.jhu.edu/2016/05/03/medical-errors-third-leading-cause-of-death/

    So it's hard to perceive just what role technology plays in iatrogenic mortality.
    Your link says:
    Rather, they say, most errors represent systemic problems, including poorly coordinated care, fragmented insurance networks, the absence or underuse of safety nets, and other protocols, in addition to unwarranted variation in physician practice patterns that lack accountability.
    None of which needs technology.

  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    I have a smart phone of course but I refuse to install an app that will tell me when it will rain. I prefer to be surprised and seek shelter.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    LeRoc wrote: »
    I have a smart phone of course but I refuse to install an app that will tell me when it will rain. I prefer to be surprised and seek shelter.

    You clearly don’t do long dog walks. I like to be togged out with waterproofs when rain is forecast :smile:

  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    LeRoc wrote: »
    I refuse to install an app that will tell me when it will rain.
    My joints tell me that. Who needs an app?
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    My joints tell me that. Who needs an app?
    Heh.

  • LeRoc wrote: »
    I have a smart phone of course but I refuse to install an app that will tell me when it will rain. I prefer to be surprised and seek shelter.
    the other side of this is weather apps are invaluable for for me.
  • RicardusRicardus Shipmate
    Crœsos wrote: »

    The article goes on to list a whole bunch of reasons to believe that Uber is not capable of success in the long-term, or even the medium-term, but a lot of it boils down to people saying "an otherwise unsustainable business model will work if we deploy it through an app!"

    A while ago I read a fairly persuasive article that argued that the main difference between a tech startup and a regular startup is not actual tech but a flexible approach to the law.

    The local taxi firm with an app doesn't pretend to be anything other than a taxi firm, and its drivers are therefore subject to regular employment law. But Uber says it is a totally new concept, and therefore old-fashioned rules of employment don't apply. See also: Airbnb, Deliveroo ...
  • balaambalaam Shipmate
    I would not download a weather app.
    It came bundled with the phone.
  • I have a weather app which I look at sometimes. Unfortunately, just like weather forecasts on the telly, five minutes later I can't remember what it told me. If only there was an app to remind me of stuff ....
  • Ricardus wrote: »
    A while ago I read a fairly persuasive article that argued that the main difference between a tech startup and a regular startup is not actual tech but a flexible approach to the law.

    I don't think this is true for all startups, but there's certainly a recent class of startups who basically rely on some form of regulatory arbitrage. A tendency reinforced by the trend to apply the same concept over and over again to different markets (so 'Uber for food' 'airbnb for offices' etc etc).
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    A tendency reinforced by the trend to apply the same concept over and over again to different markets (so 'Uber for food' 'airbnb for offices' etc etc).
    Tinder for Churches. (I'm just shooting blanks here; I'm sure something like this exists already.)

  • lilbuddha wrote: »
    Well yes, perhaps.

    But then there's this.

    https://hub.jhu.edu/2016/05/03/medical-errors-third-leading-cause-of-death/

    So it's hard to perceive just what role technology plays in iatrogenic mortality.
    Your link says:
    Rather, they say, most errors represent systemic problems, including poorly coordinated care, fragmented insurance networks, the absence or underuse of safety nets, and other protocols, in addition to unwarranted variation in physician practice patterns that lack accountability.
    None of which needs technology.

    Well I guess that just depends on how you look at it.

    Poorly coordinated care - what role does technology play in gathering, storing and communicating information related to the patient? I think some role.

    Fragmented insurance networks - what role does technology play in gathering, storing and communicating information related to the patient? I think some role.

    Absence or underuse of safety nets and other protocols - what role does technology play in gathering, storing and communicating information related to treatment standards? I think some role.

    Unwarranted variation in physician practice - what role does technology play in gathering, storing and communicating information related to treatment standards? I think some role.

    Again - I think technology plays its part in iatrogenic mortality, I just can't say and the study doesn't give us a clue. I think the fragmentation of information as it relates to patient care is in part the result of poorly applied technology.

    Just my take on it.

    AFF
  • Imagine:

    Person is on their knees, hands clasped, head slightly bowed. Someone asks "what are you doing?"
    The person answers "I'm using my app."
    The someone asks "what is your app?"
    "My app is prayer", says the person.
    "What does your app do?" asks the someone.
    "Many things", says the person, "it has praise, thanksgiving, petition, silence, and sometimes even a little singing."
    "Did you pay for your app?", asks the someone.
    "No it was free?, says the person.
    "Why do you use it?, asks the someone.
    "Because it makes me feel good and recharges me and makes me a better person"

    That's as much as I have just now. Feel free to improve it, edit it, chuck a cell phone at me, or otherwise, maybe, pray? or whatever.
  • Ricardus wrote: »
    A tendency reinforced by the trend to apply the same concept over and over again to different markets (so 'Uber for food' 'airbnb for offices' etc etc).
    Since Uber and Airbnb are just shiny stickers labelled TECH! and slapped on old business models, it is fair play.

  • Again - I think technology plays its part in iatrogenic mortality, I just can't say and the study doesn't give us a clue. I think the fragmentation of information as it relates to patient care is in part the result of poorly applied technology.
    If technology makes those things worse, then it is technology to blame. If poor implementation makes it worse, it is the same systemic issues that made them a problem before technology existed. The fragmentation of information is definitely an implementation issue. The dissemination of information is something technology can definitely do better than manual transfer.

  • I bloody hate Uber. No services for people who use wheelchairs. It costs a bomb to buy a van and do the modding necessary to be able to take a wheelchair bound customers. The drivers who make this investment (periodically mind) need other customers to get a return. Along comes Uber and pinches the easy and cheap to service customers.

    Low-hanging fruit picking bastards.

    Some quality laughs in this thread. Thanks to the joke-makers. Special mention to Gath Fach.
  • lilbuddhalilbuddha Shipmate
    edited December 7
    Uber is fucking its drivers. If enough stupid people keep investing in it, it might well fuck taxicab business and when it eventually collapses fuck its customers.
  • I think Uber is losing some of its market share these days as competitors set up other apps. For rides like airport transfers that can be booked in advance I much prefer Marcel (100% French-owned, pays all it's taxes in France, treats it's drivers well and frankly gives you much better service).
  • LeRocLeRoc Shipmate
    "My app is prayer", says the person.
    :projectile:

  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Yesterday’s O2 outage shows how modern life is reliant on technology.

    But, to be fair, the same was said about electricity once upon a time.

    Life moves on, we move with it.
Sign In or Register to comment.