AS: Cool Britannia (sort of): the British thread 2019

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  • Never been very far north of the Border, but I do like "Farewell to Stromness" - the piano piece by Peter Maxwell Davies.
    And my DH has been practising it in order to play it at the church of which he is the organist, so I have heard it a lot of late.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited August 2019
    We have quite a 'mixed bag' as a congregation at Our Place, and this morning, I was introduced to a phrase which is new to me.

    A family which consists of peeps from Portugal, the Philippines, and Trinidad (the youngest daughter is derived from all three!) was described as 'a blended family'.

    I've heard of 'reconstituted', and 'extended', families, but this seemed to me to be a happily-worded, and very apt, description.
    :grin:
  • I've always heard "blended family" to mean a blend of children from one parent, the other parent, both parents, and other children who have become part of the household. I've never heard it used in terms of nationality or ethnicity. (Maybe this is a Pond difference.)
  • Maybe I wasn't entirely clear, but the family I referred to is indeed a blend of children, parents, other children, parents, grandparents (you name it!), but they also happen to be from various ethnic groups, and nationalities, just to confuse everyone!

    I have a bit of a reputation at Our Place for remembering names, origins, countries etc., (which sort of goes with the job of Lay Minister), and I have to say I find it fascinating, and wonderful, to see how 'rainbow-coloured' the people of God (and Ukland as a whole) actually are these days.
    :wink:
  • Yes indeed. I'd go with Pigwidgeon for the definition though.
  • Fairy Nuff. It's a new-to-me phrase, as I said!
  • Pigwidgeon’s use is what is used downunder.
  • I yield! I yield! Mercy!

    Thanks to all for explanations...

  • Your point still stands though, BF.

    When I was young I was one of two brown people in the congregation 95% of the time. Then about 10 years ago we had a full complement of Eritrean altar servers, with the local Syro-Malabar community using the church for monthly services. This year we had an African mass followed by May Day parade, saying the Hail Mary in numerous languages. This is, in my opinion, no bad thing.

    We also have one or two blended families :smile:
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    That’s great @ArachnidinElmet!

    My ‘to do’ list for today is to start to prepare the bedrooms. We are having seven guests for the weekend. Boogielets 1 and 2 with their partners and a three friends.

    Boogielet 2 and wife will be sleeping on a blow up mattress in the living room - not their usual standard of accommodation.

    Yesterday was spent tidying the garden and tomorrow I’ll clean the bathrooms.

    There’s nothing like having guests for motivation to get the house in order!
  • Boogie wrote: »

    There’s nothing like having guests for motivation to get the house in order!

    It's the only reason we tidy up.
  • It's the only thing that makes me feel young again! (we had a cleaner for many years, till I retired... *sigh*)
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Checking in on you all after a lovely week in Orkney with but scant wi-fi, but lovely catch-ups with friends (some of whom I hadn't seen for the best part of 40 years!), and also some v. nice food indeed.

    We thoroughly enjoyed ourselves at the Cathedral on Sunday, with much hugging, making us feel as if we'd never left. As a lady in the choir put it, "you left your hearts here, didn't you?"

    We've had a very encouraging viewing of my dad's house from a lovely young couple, who seem genuinely taken with it, and can see past the dated interior, and even seem to like it! Crossing trotters that they might be The Ones, as we'd love to sell it to someone who'll love it. It was quite emotional locking the place up when we left, as there's a chance it'll be the last time I'll be in it. :cry:

    After a mostly uneventful trip back south (apart from a heavy shower outside Inverness - we missed all the filthy weather they got further down the road), we're back in Edinburgh for a couple of days (and Glasgow this evening to meet another friend for supper) then down to the Borders for the wedding on Saturday.

    Will catch up again later - sorry for the War and Peace-sized post!
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited August 2019
    Not really a War, more a gentle Skirmish I think.

    PS The weather must have hit you in the Central Belt, surely? - torrential rain near Linlithgow.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Lovely and sunny here in Manchester. ☀️
  • Welcome back from the Civilised Northlands, piglet! Glad you enjoyed the trip.
    :grin:
  • Piglet wrote: »
    we're back in Edinburgh for a couple of days (and Glasgow this evening
    Hope you made that journey OK, Piglet. Tea-time news report showed flooded railway line and road between the two.
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    Hope you are not flooded out @Piglet, and that the couple have put in an offer on your dad's place. I'd much rather buy somewhere that was basically sound, but needed updating than somewhere where the previous owners had done it up 'to sell', so I hope they feel the same.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Given the rain that's been and the rain that's promised, Mr F and I are electing to do the weekly shop at the supermarket with the rooftop parking rather than at the one built on the floodplain of the Braidburn.
  • I’m back from spending 2 weeks on a narrow boat in Cheshire/Lancashire then North Wales, the first week was at the start of last week’s downpours (we were not far from Whaley Bridge at the time of the dam damage) and we were timing our lock runs to avoid the torrential downpours.
    It was fabulous. The Cheshire Ring took us from the picturesque (and arduous) locks of Marple, past the beautifully austere mills of Macclesfield and Ashton under Lyne and on to the bustle of Manchester, where we struggled with neglected lock gates in a seedy underground lock beneath a shopping centre, surrounded by signs telling us that it is an offence to commit sexual acts there and whilst being observed by the local drug dealers. Our propeller picked up a coat around here. Yet round the corner was the trendy area of Castlefield, where we moored, visited a museum and had an excellent curry. Onwards we proceeded through pretty villages and past huge chemical plants to join the Llangollen canal towards the amazing aqueducts of North Wales, then back again to Middlewich. Definitely one of my favourite holidays.

    I’m now wading through 2 weeks worth of washing belonging to 4 people. And I’m back on a diet, having lived on mainly bread, tea and cake, and pub grub, for 2 weeks.
  • Heavenlyannie that sounds wonderful. Mr T and I used to do a lot of canal boating, but never managed the Cheshire Ring. When we moved to Macclesfield wedid many a dog walk along the tow paths, but now alas I am on my own and cannot walk far. But I would have come and waved if I'd known you were coming!

    That Manchester lock sounds much like some of the less salubrious ones in Birmingham! I shudder to think what must be lurking under the water in those locks!
  • Hubby was a bit nervous when he found the coat around the propeller that there might be someone still in it! We want to go again and do the Four Counties, though a more relaxing amble to Chester might be on the cards first.
  • Some friends and I navigated the Cheshire Ring over 30 years ago (IIRC the Ashton section had only recently been restored), and yes, the bit under the office blocks in Manchester was somewhat off-putting!

    We managed the Ring in just a week, but it was Hard Toil and Sweaty Labour...
    :flushed:
  • Actually, it was more like 40 years ago...
    :fearful:
  • The Ashton section around Ancoats used to have a poor reputation for boaters being harrassed by local kids but we had no problems as the area has been redeveloped and the canal much cleaned up. But the Piccadilly locks were in poor shape, not helped by the heavy rains causing water to pour over the top of the gates - the locks refilled as fast as we tried to empty them! We did the Ring in 8 days but would have managed it in a week if it hadn’t been for the poor weather at the beginning. We managed the Llangollen canal in less than five days to meet our deadline for returning the boat but they were very long days. But we had two fit teenage boys to do the locks so that made life easier.
  • Yes, the Piccadilly locks were in poor shape 40 years back!

    Again IIRC the canal was over-full, so that the towpath was underwater, necessitating the crew taking to the streets in order to get ahead to the next lock...

    In those days, the Manchester bit was privately-owned (the Rochdale Canal Company) rather than British Waterways. Is that still so?
  • HeavenlyannieHeavenlyannie Shipmate
    edited August 2019
    The Rochdale is part of British Waterways now, I think, though the name is the Canal and River Trust these days, a charity.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Onward steam! the Captain cried
    For we are sorely pressed!
    The Engineer from the bank replied
    The oul' horse is doing his best
  • DormouseDormouse Shipmate
    edited August 2019
    Some friends and I navigated the Cheshire Ring over 30 years ago (IIRC the Ashton section had only recently been restored), and yes, the bit under the office blocks in Manchester was somewhat off-putting!

    We managed the Ring in just a week, but it was Hard Toil and Sweaty Labour...
    :flushed:

    I also did the same, about the same length of time ago. I don't know you, do I?! Did you go to KAC,Winchester?

    When we went, one of us navigated through Manchester holding an umbrella against the small, spitting oiks, who leant over bridges, gobbing at the passing boats, while the rest of us sheltered inside.
  • Dormouse wrote: »
    [Did you go to KAC,Winchester?
    Or travel on these? https://tinyurl.com/y3yma9jp

  • We managed the Ring in just a week, but it was Hard Toil and Sweaty Labour...
    :flushed:

    It sounds as if you're talking about Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen!
    :wink:
    (which I "managed" -- i.e., thoroughly enjoyed -- in six days last year)




  • In answer to @Dormouse, and @Baptist Trainfan , alas, no...to both questions!

    The term 'The Ring' always reminds me of the One Ring, the Ring Of Power, coveted by Sauron...
  • Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    It sounds as if you're talking about Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen!
    :wink:
    (which I "managed" -- i.e., thoroughly enjoyed -- in six days last year)

    I saw it many moons ago ... it took me four years!

  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    My dad got very keen on canal boating in the sixties, I remember doing the Market Harborough arm when you were basically hacking a path through the weeds. My dad's insistence on doing epic journeys in a very short time in the only holidays we had as a family has put me right off canal holidays, which is a shame as it is something my husband and son love.
  • We had several years of happy holidays on the canal system...brings back memories! (MrStE did the steering while I did the locks etc...)
  • A college friend organised several canal holidays. He and his wife had honeymooned on the cut. All the brochures talk about canal holidays as being leisurely, lie ins, lunch at a canal side pub, dinner at another...Not so under P's direction. Breakfast was bacon butties eaten on the move, lunch was cheese and fresh home made bread, on the move, and we'd cruise till dusk. (P managed to convince the girls in the party that kneading the bread dough was "fun").
    This is how we managed the 4 counties ring in a week, including some detours to places of interest. P had also been known to make jam on one narrow boat holiday.
  • PuzzlerPuzzler Shipmate
    My first canal holiday was as a student. I was the only female as it happened, so I did most of the steering through locks, leaving the men to do the tough work.
    We did the Grand Union, Oxford Canal and River Thames circuit.
  • You were a real Idle Woman, then: https://tinyurl.com/yxgehmb9
  • Some of my canal holidays feature the delectable memory of The Bestest Chocolate CAKE In All The World.

    Said CAKE was made by Mrs BF's mother, and I knew the cruise had truly begun, when a Huge Slice of CAKE was handed to me, at the tiller...
    :grin:
  • Had said Lady ever been a Tiller Girl?
  • :lol:

    Not AFAIK...
  • Nothing can compare with sailing with my late father in law, the terror of the Hudson River, the worst sailor I have ever known, with my beloved mother in law as first mate. She was and still is a saint on account of those voyages. If they hadn't demolished the old Tappan Zee bridge, he would probably have done it for them. Sorry - irresistible tangent.
  • Canal boating sounds wonderful. Apart from the troublesome yoofs of time past.

    Thank you for sharing the memories.
  • I've only once taken an overnight on a narrowboat - loved it.

    Other than that, I sail from time to time.
  • JapesJapes Shipmate
    One of my walking challenges at the moment is to walk all the canal towpaths in the West Midlands. Which has some interesting challenges best voiced on a TICTH thread. But I do appreciate the cyclists and runners who do see us considerate walkers, (keeping to the side, willing to share space,) as fellow travellers and not as nuisances.
  • The Shropshire Canal is lovely - a brilliant walk for blackberrying!
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited August 2019
    The late Frank Muir wrote that the great advantage of narrow-boat holidays, which he loved, was that you got all the joy and excitement of life on the ocean wave while never being more than about 4 feet from dry land. About all I've ever managed were "Jason" and "Jenny Wren" on the Regent's Canal, which don't really count.
  • PuzzlerPuzzler Shipmate
    Thanks for the link, Baptist Trainfan. Most enlightening.
    You were a real Idle Woman, then: https://tinyurl.com/yxgehmb9

  • The late Frank Muir wrote that the great advantage of narrow-boat holidays, which he loved, was that you got all the joy and excitement of life on the ocean wave while never being more than about 4 feet from dry land. About all I've ever managed were "Jason" and "Jenny Wren" on the Regent's Canal, which don't really count.

    I'm not sure Mr Muir was entirely correct. The joy, and excitement, of the Cut are not quite as rough, and dangerous, as those of the Sea - but the water is still cold, wet, and drown-in-able...
    :grimace:

    I know whereof I speak - not that I've actually drowned anywhere, though it's not for want of trying. They should put up blue plaques at the places on the canal system where I've Fallen In.

    No, the canal-side Pubs, and their ALE, had nothing to do with it at all.
  • The thought would never have crossed our minds ... Stoke Bruerne, here we come!
This discussion has been closed.