Cool Britannia (sort of): the British thread 2019

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  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited January 10
    I suspect the colours in today's lunch wouldn't actually get the approval of the food police: brown potato scones, red tomatoes, yellow and white eggs and pink bacon. :blush:

    Afterwards there was the Cathedral afternoon tea, which also had lots of colours, but they were from things like sugared fruit jellies and gumdrop cake ... :mrgreen:

    I did, however, get a tiny modicum of exercise: we got about a foot of snow over yesterday and last night, and some shovelling had to be done. D. did the deck and path as far as the front end of the car, and I did from there round to the end of the drive (and the stuff that had blown under the car) where we'd been ploughed in.

    I hate snow. :angry:
  • ...
    Followed by a G and T :)
    Depending on the brand that could be one of your greens (my favourite would make it a blue).
    It’s jolly perishing here in daisydaisy-land. Enough to make me dig out the hottie and for my feline house mate to seek out my company for warmth.
  • Well, the bottle was purple, it was a Parma violets one my husband bought me for Christmas (which tastes better than it sounds).
    So far this morning I’ve walked to the dentist in Cambridge, had a filling and then walked back home. That’s 5 miles already today. Now a sit down before getting some work done.
  • DormouseDormouse Shipmate
    Just had a bowl of curried sweet potato & leek soup, plus a slice of ham-and-cheese on toast. It's really hard finding gammon here in France, but IKEA do a Christmas ham (Jul-pig or something) which is good. I roasted it with a marmalade/honey/orange glaze yesterday. Having it tonight with a mushroom/pasta dish.
  • Sweet potato here too, in the form of a spicy sweet potato and kidney bean hot pot. I’ve made enough to freeze another meal. It’s still cooking and will be followed up by a ‘mess’ made from layered summer fruit compote, custard, meringue nests and clotted cream
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    I gained the half you lost @TheOrganist!

    🙄🙄🙄
  • I think this is the cosiest thread on the internet. All bird song, roaring fires and warming food (& beverages!).
    Any good tips for cauliflower? I have about a third of a huge one left. I’ve done roasted florets, roasted “steaks,” boiled mini-florets & fancy something different to finish it off over the weekend.

  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Cauliflower cheese of course!

    😋
  • Ooo, very tempting. I do have some cheddar and a smidge of Stilton.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    -
    ... Any good tips for cauliflower? ...
    There's a really nice recipe in the old Delia Smith books for cauliflower sauteed with garlic and crushed coriander seeds - it gets slightly nutty and browned, and keeps its nice crunchy texture.

    Lunch here today was DIY sandwiches - bacon, chicken and tomato for D., and bacon, avocado and tomato for me (have I mentioned before that avocadoes are proof that God loves us?).
    daisydaisy wrote: »
    ...It’s jolly perishing here in daisydaisy-land ...

    At -11° but feeling like -20° with the wind-chill it's a bit parky in Pigletsville too. :wink:

    Possibly time to make some SOUP ...

  • I like cauliflower and chick pea curry, but I have to add some meat as homemade sheekh kebabs to keep my daughter happy.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I made a hasty soup for lunch with beans, onion, carrot and kalettes - which was surprisingly good.
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    Macarius made a lovely lamb rogan with dal, rice and chapattis - yum!

    I’ve never come across kalettes, Firenze, I’ll have to look out for them, they look intriguing. I like Brussels sprouts and don’t mind kale, although I was put off a bit as a child (when did it stop being called curly kale?)

    MMM
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host
    I like cauliflower polonaise. Online this recipe looks about right.

    On another note doesn’t kale (like parsley) come in both curly and flat-leafed varieties. (Or should that be ‘leaved’)
  • I thought cavolo nero was a form of kale, which has a flatter leaf than curly kale.

    I liked kalettes when I tried them. They turned up in the reduced box one day and I thought they'd be interesting to try, so did.
  • Those kalettes look interesting, other half has just suggested them for a Christmas dinner next year.
    Lazy day so far, I really need to get dressed and go for a walk (will try to convince my husband to join me) but I need to wait for the children to get up first so they can listen for a parcel delivery.
    Husband is installing a gaming computer in the lounge so he and the boys will be engrossed in that all day, and possibly the rest of their days. I’m going to do a crochet project, possibly the unicorn I got for Christmas.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Continuing with the warming bowlfuls, yesterday I did a very hasty soup of bean, carrot onion and (first time ever) kalettes. It turned out surprisingly well - possibly helped by fair dusting of ras el hanout.

    Today will be more bean, with fresh chilli, and a topping of grated cheese.
  • I have tried kale a few times, but really disliked the texture, and the flavour hasn't been enjoyable enogh to compensate - however I do like kalettes. Sadly I haven't yet found a really satisfactory way of cooking them - I usually boil briefly, but they don't drain very thoroughly and come out a bit water-logged.
    I know I probably ought to steam them, but my previous attempts at steaming green veg (a good 20 years ago) were not successful and I have yet to convince myself it would be worth the effort to unearth the steamer basket from under all the other pans and lids.

    Nor am I sure that I wouldn't use it more for syrupy suet dumplings than fresh veg!

    I did try growing a few kalette plants from seed this year. They seemed to produce a reasonable crop, but a bad fall just when they were just looking ready has left me with a painful back, and I can't bend to pick them.
  • I’ve never come across kalettes but I am rather fond of curly kale so I’ll look out for them.
  • Having lived in Portugal in the past, we sometimes make "Caldo Verde" soup. Ideally this uses "Couve de Galega" (https://tinyurl.com/ybgvc4z5) which we can get chopped and frozen in a shop in town (well, Splott). However Brussels Sprouts tops or Kale also work.

    Cardiff is fortunate to have a small chain of excellent Portuguese patisseries!
  • Would they sauté nicely?
    I’ve walked to the garden centre and bought hellebores for the front border. I’ve also remembered that I bought some jersey cream yesterday with the aim for making a curd cheese so I need to do that today. I will use half the curds in a curd tart, the rest to use as a garlicky cheese on bread.
  • Kalettes do stir fry nicely - it's how I've eaten them. But then I'll eat kale and Brussel sprouts stir fried.
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited January 12
    Heavenlyannie: I don't know.

    We love hellebores, in our last place we were fortunate enough to have a specialist nursery close by and we bought several unusual ones. Quite pricey though!
  • Yesterday I went to a friend's birthday party at the all-you-can-eat Asian buffet. We got our money's worth :smile:

    Today I have not left the house. So there. Husband en rouge is currently engaged in the production of SOUP (that famous variety produced from all the leftovers in the bottom of the fridge, which AFAIC is the best kind) and I made a banana pudding earlier with a 'nana that was going black and mushy. I love banana pudding.
  • Ooo banana pudding recipe please!
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    We used to keep small caged pets who loved raw curly kale. They tucked into it with such gusto I thought it must be delicious so I tried some one day. >vom< I expect it's ok cooked.

    My white Christmas hellebore which I had last year and planted in the garden has not flowered at all this year. :disappointed: There were some lovely ones at the local garden shop when I walked through this afternoon; I resisted buying one and am now regretting it.
  • We saw some too this afternoon but resisting them at £18.99 wasn't too hard!
  • DormouseDormouse Shipmate
    Just hearing the news about a gas explosion in Paris...it appears that LVER is safe. And having SOUP.
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    We saw some too this afternoon but resisting them at £18.99 wasn't too hard!

    Egad! Were they massive ones? Our garden shop was selling them for a fiver!

    In food news, stir fry is on the menu at our house. Saturday night is always stir fry night and I look forward to it all week. :smiley:
  • All this talk of Warming Food ( despite the fact that SE Ukland, at least, is quite mild - albeit grey - at the moment) reminds me that, yesterday, I did something which is probably (according to the food police) Illegal. Perhaps being another person who did not go out all day emboldened me in this rash(er) enterprise... :wink:

    Fancying a BACON sandwich, I accordingly mobilised the Palace Frying-Pan, and placed in it some olive oil and some rashers of BACON. The Palace Stove duly obliged by providing me with a suitable filling for the said sandwich after no more than a few minutes' sizzling.
    :yum:

    Tomato sauce was, of course, applied to the bread-and-butter beforehand.
  • I love hellebores, and brought several orientals with me from our old garden and they have settled in very well. They can be pretty expensive if you go for a named variety - I bought a supposedly very dark purplish one a few years ago (forget its name just at the moment), but it is no darker than one I first transplanted from a friends garden in Wales 15 years ago

    Most of my hellebores are self-seeded, they are very prolific, and the few I have bought have been chosen to encourage a mix of genes in the hope of good colour variety.
    I bought a new one last year, which I hope will bring a new range of colours into the bed - not a named variety, so cost about a fiver.

    Gardening here is more difficult than in my last garden, and I am not getting any younger, so I am encouraging plants that do well and giving up on things that are not happy here.
    The hellebores seem to like it (other than one I planted in dry shade last spring and just didn't water enough), and so do cyclamen, both self-seed and I love both.
    Going to try a few other favourites in the hope that some will prove to be just as happy here.

    I just need to keep the Spanish bluebells from taking over - they love it here, and will smother everything else if not kept in check.
  • Can’t beat bacon, imo, though I tend to like mine with a fried egg instead of the bread.
    Curd cheesemaking a success, we now have a curd tart for pudding (perhaps with a spot of leftover summer fruit compote and custard?), garlicky cream cheese for tomorrow and some ricotta made from left over whey from the first curdle. Other half has used the remaining whey as a base for a spicy split pea SOUP which we will have with chapattis.
  • Roseofsharon, we have Spanish bluebells in our garden and they spread like weeds!
  • Bishops Finger / Heavenlyannie
    What you require is not ketchup (yes, I'm looking at you, BF) and nor should you eschew bread HA: the solution is a Breakfast Sandwich.

    Much-loved in our household, a basic model is 3-4 rashers of crispy streaky and a fried egg with one slice of bread buttered, the upper (nearest the yolk) not. Of course, if you're feeling particularly hungry I can recommend the deluxe version which has a layer of thinly sliced sauteed mushrooms betwixt bacon and egg - enjoy :grin:
  • Nenya wrote: »
    We saw some too this afternoon but resisting them at £18.99 wasn't too hard!

    Egad! Were they massive ones? Our garden shop was selling them for a fiver!
    No, but not tiny either. There are some ordinary ones at Lidl for £3.99 - we bought one last week.

  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I made my first-ever attempt at pastry-making yesterday: we had some left-over chicken and I found a recipe for chicken en croute which didn't look too complicated.

    It was sort of OK (D. liked it, but he's a sucker for any kind of PIE). I discovered too late that my baking-sheets weren't quite big enough to accommodate the pastry before folding it up, and I seemed to have more filling than I needed, so I ended up making two separate pies, one a sort of parcel, and the other a casserole with a hat, which I've frozen for another time.

    @la vie en rouge - glad to hear you're OK - I was thinking of you, husband en rouge and Captain Pyjamas when I heard about the gas explosion.

    Having very ungreen fingers, I had to Google hellebores - they do look lovely. Talking of things herbaceous, do any of you grow hyacinths from bulbs? D. was saying the other day he'd like to give them a go, as he loves the scent, but are we too late to plant them for this year? (I have vague memories of my dad planting them before Christmas, but I may be wrong).
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited January 12
    My wife tonight made a lovely PIE with leftover venison from Christmas and assorted root vegetables. The puff pastry was bought at Asda and she glazed it with egg. Very Yummy but I still have to wash up!

    PS Yes, she grows hyacinths from bulbs. One is in bloom by the fireplace as I write.
  • MMMMMM Shipmate
    We also had pie made of Christmas leftovers this evening - I’d done the last bits of ham in a cheese sauce with leeks and mushrooms and frozen them just after new year, and had some leftover pastry frozen as well, so it made a very easy pie, as well as a very delicious one.

    All this talk of bacon - yum! We had a few rashers of bacon in the ‘fridge, so we had them with a little eggy and a fried slice this morning.

    This is turning into a menu thread!

    Glad to hear that La V-en-R is OK.

    MMM
  • There was a small piece of bacon in our pie too ...
  • @Piglet, you plant Hyacinths in the autumn. If you want them indoors you should get some that have been specially treated (don't know what they do) and when you have planted them keep them somewhere dark and cool like a cupboard, until the shoots are about an inch tall. Then bring them out. Of course they should be kept moist but not flooded. Or you can grow them inHyacinth glasses, with the water just below but not touching the bottom of the bulb. The clever roots sense the water and sprout downwards. I have three like that blooming now.
  • Bishops Finger / Heavenlyannie
    What you require is not ketchup (yes, I'm looking at you, BF) and nor should you eschew bread HA: the solution is a Breakfast Sandwich.

    Much-loved in our household, a basic model is 3-4 rashers of crispy streaky and a fried egg with one slice of bread buttered, the upper (nearest the yolk) not. Of course, if you're feeling particularly hungry I can recommend the deluxe version which has a layer of thinly sliced sauteed mushrooms betwixt bacon and egg - enjoy :grin:

    Sorry, but I can't abide eggs - whether fried, boiled, or in an omelette - though otherwise the breakfast sandwich is indeed a thing of beauty....
    :flushed:

  • ....so please may I have a Sossidge, instead of a Negg?
    :wink:
  • You'll eat what you're given!!
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    Piglet wrote: »
    Talking of things herbaceous, do any of you grow hyacinths from bulbs? D. was saying the other day he'd like to give them a go, as he loves the scent, but are we too late to plant them for this year? (I have vague memories of my dad planting them before Christmas, but I may be wrong).

    I think you're too late. I plant hyacinth bulbs in October or November, and I'm very far south of you.

  • Yes, that's when we put ours in.
  • Roseofsharon, we have Spanish bluebells in our garden and they spread like weeds!
    They are weeds! We have been battling them since we moved in. Unfortuantely our neighbour encourages them (or, at least doesn't discourage them, they need no encouragement! She also grows the three-cornered leek, which is equally rampant!

    I suppose she is only following the horticultural path I am planning on using - grow what likes your land! But I want to like the plants, too.

  • I used to work in an Elderly Care Home, and each year 'rescued' thrown-out pots of hyacinth bulbs, which had been given as Christmas gifts by loving relatives, once they had had bloomed and died. They were planted out in our garden, and grew again each spring , obviously not as lush as they had as treated indoor bulbs, but scented - and still alive!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Looks as if we'll have to put the hyacinths on the back burner until next year, but thanks for the info anyway!

    In other news, I wonder if I ought to make some SOUP for tomorrow's lunch?

  • I've just decided that today's lunch is going to be a bacon sandwich. It just has to be, although my OH will almost certainly have cheese on toast as that's his favourite on a Sunday lunchtime.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    My diet starts again tomorrow - so you can all stop talking about food, as of now!

    :tongue:
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