None standard intelligence

HugalHugal Shipmate
Over the last decade or so the idea of that intelligence can be expressed in different ways has grown. Mensa style intelligence with its basis in logic and knowledge have been opposed by the likes of artists intelligence. Those like me who think more creatively and express that in artistic ways.
Are they separate forms of intelligence or just part of the Mensa style one?
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Comments

  • Intelligence seems poorly defined in the first place, and carries connotations of immutability that are not necessarily accurate or helpful. Much better, I think, to talk about skills in specific areas. Memory, working memory, verbal reasoning, non-verbal reasoning, spatial awareness, empathy, creativity, making connections. Naturally some of these might be easier to assess than others, but I think trying to cram them all under the heading of intelligence is to buy into the flawed pseudo-eugenicist idea of intelligence.

    For what it's worth I speak as someone who tends to score highly on IQ tests, though I've never felt to insecure as to need to join Mensa.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    I’m very differently wired neurologically. I have diagnoses of ADHD and dyslexia - and who knows what else is going on in my differently ordered brain?

    Which causes people to think I’m incredibly intelligent “Wow - how did you do that?” or incredibly thick “How can you not do/remember that?”

    I was a conundrum to teachers. They either had me sitting in the corner colouring in or leading class groups and discussions. I changed school often and was put either in the top set or bottom set depending on how they tested me.

    No half measures :lol:

  • I’m someone who is never going to score well on any intelligence test but that has never bothered me because I know that they are never going to be able to measure the skills that I am really good at. Because it is very hard to measure the ability to tell people they are going blind, or to comfort people while they are dying.
  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    The other problem is that things like Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences has been both misused and debunked. It's useful in pointing out other skills and aptitudes to boost self-esteem, but pretty useless otherwise.
  • RublevRublev Shipmate
    Gerard Hughes pioneered the development of St Beuno's as an Ignatian retreat centre, and he writes about the importance of the creative imagination in faith. He comments that, 'Feelings are important and must be listened to, for they are intelligent, often more intelligent than our conscious minds. Emotion and reason are not opposites, but complementary' (God, Where Are You p151).

    I remember once my intuition alerting me when I was in a crowd at Covent Garden and I looked up and saw a pickpocket about to snatch my purse. He ran away when he saw I had spotted him. I have no idea how my mind picked up on the danger. But I think the definition of human intelligence covers a wide spectrum and we need to use different types of intelligence for different tasks and situations.
  • HugalHugal Shipmate
    Should an IQ test be the Measure of intelligence? If we do not have the same skills is it a reliable guide? I think not but I would not score massively highly. The world does seem to be run for those that do though.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    Rublev wrote: »
    Gerard Hughes pioneered the development of St Beuno's as an Ignatian retreat centre, and he writes about the importance of the creative imagination in faith. He comments that, 'Feelings are important and must be listened to, for they are intelligent, often more intelligent than our conscious minds. Emotion and reason are not opposites, but complementary' (God, Where Are You p151).

    I remember once my intuition alerting me when I was in a crowd at Covent Garden and I looked up and saw a pickpocket about to snatch my purse. He ran away when he saw I had spotted him. I have no idea how my mind picked up on the danger. But I think the definition of human intelligence covers a wide spectrum and we need to use different types of intelligence for different tasks and situations.
    Your peripheral vision would have picked up some movement or clue which would have been transmitted into your brain and interpreted in a split second. I say this with confidence because peripheral vision (to one side only) is all I have and prior to that, I had no idea just how much it pickes up.



  • RublevRublev Shipmate
    I wondered if it was an example of the mysterious sixth sense that gets talked about but is never defined. They say that you should always pay attention to your instincts because they are your ancient survival mechanisms, but often we override them with our rational minds and discount them. I'm always very careful when walking through Covent Garden now.
  • Hugal wrote: »
    Should an IQ test be the Measure of intelligence? If we do not have the same skills is it a reliable guide? I think not but I would not score massively highly. The world does seem to be run for those that do though.

    Actually those who score really highly on IQ tests tend not to be enormously successful by the world's standards. The world is run by those who can exploit others effectively. Trump, for example, wouldn't get stellar scores on an IQ test but possesses an ability to read and influence people. Hitler, likewise, wasn't all that bright but could captivate a crowd. More generally, class, race and gender pay a huge part in how people are treated by the world - compare for example Boris Johnson and Diane Abbott. Johnson can get away with errors that would get Abbott pilloried, and of the two Abbott is almost certainly the cleverer, but because of their respective backgrounds it is Johnson that gets treated as an intellectual because he can quip in Latin.
  • OhherOhher Shipmate
    Our systems for schooling children tend to reward only certain aspects of intelligence. I get first-year students every fall who are convinced that getting through tasks quickly shows them to be smart, whereas what I'm actually asking for is deliberation and attention to detail.
  • G and the little g's it's made up of. wiki article about, which provides an introduction. Intelligence measures have historically been misused for racist, sexist and other politically motivated reasons.

    These data in my work I see many people who are brilliantly book smart, with much less practical intelligence.
  • I used to get that, the race to shout finished first and sit smugly in judgement over your friends was an ever present problem, especially in Year 7 & 8. The only counter was to time tests and knock points off for shouting out. They hated that!

    There is a hierarchy of acceptable interests that supplement intelligence, someone who is a genius but only applies it to playing Fortnite is still "a loser" compared to someone barely competent but who knows a few latin phrases or has an extensive vocabulary. I'm not very intelligent, not Mensa material, but I know quite a bit of the right kind of stuff so people often think I am. Damn, I think I just outed myself as a Boris...
  • These data in my work I see many people who are brilliantly book smart, with much less practical intelligence.

    I'm reasonably convinced that this is much more to do with motivations than anything else - and for anything requiring a reasonable amount of manual dexterity practice with such things early on.
  • I'm not sure I understood what you just said. Is it that motivation (or the lack of it) accounts for differences in practical intelligence and manual dexterity? Because if so, that's not my experience.

    In terms of manual dexterity, I am about as clumsy as they come--and that is largely due to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, or so I am told. (Myopia and lefthandedness may also play into it.) No amount of practice made it possible for me to play pingpong before my mid-twenties (and I am still utterly crap at it). My cartilage is too bendy and disobedient. With the best will in the world I cannot manipulate objects with any precision, and I regularly misjudge where parts of my body are in spatial terms. No matter how much I practice a movement, I do not get consistent results from one time to the next. It's like trying to get spaghetti to fall consistently. I have decided to stay permanently in intro dance classes because after years I can still not make enough progress to move to the next semester level, and I'm in it mainly for health reasons and to be the performing bear that encourages shy students that they aren't the worst in the room. (Like I care at my age) In short, motivation has crap-all to do with my physical skills, or lack thereof.

    The same is true of a teenager we fostered who had no practical intelligence whatsoever. She had a sweet personality, was utterly willing, docile, and tractable, and was bright enough to attend a good private high school and get through astronomy material that boggled my mind. But she was utterly disabled when it came to practical intelligence of any sort. No street smarts, no idea of how to attack a practical difficulty in life, needed to be led by the hand on issues like "what should I do when an internet stranger claims to be a Saudi prince and professes his love for me?" and "my father just attacked me again. How should I respond to this situation?" (In case you're wondering, the only things she came up with were "believe the 'prince' and do whatever he says," and "do absolutely nothing to stay out of my father's hands or even keep out of his eyesight"--we're not talking Stockholm syndrome or battered women stuff, I mean to all appearances it never even occurred to her to avoid his company. Like, staying in your room, or going to the library or something.

    That continued when she came to live with me for a year, and couldn't come up with any idea on how to complete her astronomy homework when a tree was obscuring the view she needed. Like, maybe find a different vantage point?

    It wasn't motivation. God knows what it was, but I fear for her future.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I'm also very lacking in coordination, also partly due to EDS, partly due to severe myopia (which in turn is linked to EDS), and also Aspergers is related to poor coordination too, and poor proprioception - and I'm left-handed too. I didn't learn to walk till I was two, which is apparently very late, and that wasn't lack of motivation, Though I think struggling with coordination did then mean also I lacked motivation for physical activities as a child, especially as PE teachers would get annoyed with me and think it was deliberate and laziness. Of course, all the motivation in the world wouldn't have given me great dexterity, but equally, as an adult, without the pressure of angry, accusatory teachers, I have enjoyed learning to swim, and find it a great sensory experience, and am reasonable good at breast stroke.

    I am actually very good at IQ tests - I'm good at finding patterns in things. And although people scoff at IQ and say it has no relation to the real world (and it's true I'll never be successful or have any skills or desire for exploiting people), I'd say that the ability to observe little details and find patterns has made me pretty good at working with people with various learning/developmental disabilities, and also emotional and behavioural difficulties. I observe the things that inspire and motivate them, the things that upset and trigger them - observations of lots of tiny things, seeing patterns, helps me relate to people who many people find hard to understand, and to bring out the best in them. But in this sort of situation motivation is important too - you have to be motivated to want to support and empower people in the best possible way. All the observational skills in the world wouldn't make a difference if you're not motivated to do this. And I am motivated because of knowing from personal experience what a difference it makes when people make the effort to observe you and get to know you, rather than make assumptions or just find you weird.

    I also like drawing portraits, which people say is a different sort of intelligence, but I think that is also about observing details. It is quite mathematical too, because your brain is always judging distances and angles and ratios. But also, through those mathematical observations, a drawing can capture a personality and emotion of a face.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    These data in my work I see many people who are brilliantly book smart, with much less practical intelligence.

    I'm reasonably convinced that this is much more to do with motivations than anything else - and for anything requiring a reasonable amount of manual dexterity practice with such things early on.

    Sorry - I'm missing a step here. What is "practical intelligence" and what has it to do with manual dexterity?
  • fineline wrote: »
    I'm also very lacking in coordination, also partly due to EDS, partly due to severe myopia (which in turn is linked to EDS), and also Aspergers is related to poor coordination too, and poor proprioception - and I'm left-handed too. I didn't learn to walk till I was two, which is apparently very late, and that wasn't lack of motivation,

    Though I think struggling with coordination did then mean also I lacked motivation for physical activities as a child, especially as PE teachers would get annoyed with me and think it was deliberate and laziness.

    Yes, of course I didn't mean that people who lacked coordination just needed to pull themselves together and try harder - or even that it was possible that they could - lack of motivation can also be down to bad teachers, and/or not encountering an activity that was motivating.

    So it's not necessarily something that people have the ability to 'fix' by themselves -- just that the capability to do so to a reasonable level always exists - except at the margins.
    I also like drawing portraits, which people say is a different sort of intelligence, but I think that is also about observing details.

    It also requires a fair amount of fine motor control -- so on that level at least you've been able to teach yourself to be coordinated.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    It's gross motor skills, not fine ones, that are more of a problem for me.
  • fineline wrote: »
    I am actually very good at IQ tests - I'm good at finding patterns in things. And although people scoff at IQ and say it has no relation to the real world (and it's true I'll never be successful or have any skills or desire for exploiting people), I'd say that the ability to observe little details and find patterns has made me pretty good at working with people with various learning/developmental disabilities, and also emotional and behavioural difficulties. I observe the things that inspire and motivate them, the things that upset and trigger them - observations of lots of tiny things, seeing patterns, helps me relate to people who many people find hard to understand, and to bring out the best in them. But in this sort of situation motivation is important too - you have to be motivated to want to support and empower people in the best possible way. All the observational skills in the world wouldn't make a difference if you're not motivated to do this. And I am motivated because of knowing from personal experience what a difference it makes when people make the effort to observe you and get to know you, rather than make assumptions or just find you weird.
    I find this post fascinating because I am useless at IQ tests and hopeless at finding patterns. Yet I also relate to people who are different and I support and empower them. I rely on my intuition, experience and empathy, you on your ability to observe patterns in behaviour. Yet the result is that same, we care for others. Perhaps the motivation is more of a key feature as I have personal experience of being different, having bipolar disorder myself, and having a disabled parent and visually impaired twin as well family with learning disabilities.
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    Some time back I remember an article that compared the physical intelligence of professional basketball players with their IQ intelligence. As I recall, they said there was a correlation. I cannot find the article anywhere on the internet though.
  • I'd think anything of one person will correlate positively with anything else of the same person, because it is within one person.

    There's a saying I've heard attributed to ancient Greece: "The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing." Are some of us foxes and the other of us hedgehogs?
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    My daughters had a friend in high school who did not do well academically, but was remarkably gifted at figuring what to do in a tight situation.

    Once when she was driving, a moose suddenly walked across the road. There was no way she could avoid hitting it broadside. If the hood of your car goes between the front and hind legs, the moose will come up on the hood and through the windshield, frequently hitting and killing the driver. She quickly undid her seatbelt and dove under the dashboard. she wasn't hurt, but the car was totalled. Very few people would think of that
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    (Unrelated to the topic at hand, but why isn't anyone saying anything about the title? Is "None" being used in some way that I am not intelligent enough to understand? Lily Pad, exceptionally gifted at spotting non-standard spelling.)
  • HugalHugal Shipmate
    It is a way of using none I use all the time and have heard others use it.
  • RussRuss Shipmate
    People have many different skills and abilities that are useful. Not being labelled as "intelligence" doesn't make them not valuable.

    We're all somewhere on the bell curve. There are people with higher and lower IQs than yours, whoever you are. Live with it...
  • I certainly think attitude & frama of mind make a huge difference. I’ve met people who could breeze IQ tests but are unable to commit to & engage with education or can’t cope with the social element. But I’ve met plenty who are not exceptional academics but thrived with the social element sometimes to the point of distraction.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Hugal wrote: »
    It is a way of using none I use all the time and have heard others use it.

    It's usually spelt "non" though, was I think Lily Pad's point.
  • HugalHugal Shipmate
    Ah. I am dyslexic, but point taken
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    To help you remember, the little line from the exam in 1066 and All That (slightly adapted): If your mother's a nun, write none.
  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    edited April 30
    As the mother, sister, cousin of dyslexics, the problem is not having brains wired to see letters in the same way, so helpful rhymes just aren't. Many dyslexics describe letters dancing on the page and often spell with all the letters there, just in the wrong order. Asking them to see the difference between different homophones is often asking too much.

    The only way my very intelligent daughter* stopped timing everything in minuets (not minutes) was by programming her laptop to reject minuet as a real word. And she had to ask me to identify which word to select to do this. She genuinely can't see the difference between minute and minuet. Asking her to proof read or correct passages is an exercise in frustration.

    However, she can visualise in 3D from plans or maps and if she concentrates can visualise how an engineering drawing will move, so see in 4D, because her brain is wired to do that. One of the most challenging standard maths tasks for many school students is being able to visualise how a drawn 3D shape will look when rotated. And it is commonly an easy exercise for dyslexics, who tend not to realise that others find this challenging. There are architect firms in the USA that select for dyslexics as they have this ability to see in 3D and dyslexics tend to do well in engineering, engine maintenance or delivery driving, so tasks that require spatial understanding.

    One of the problems with the general assumption that reading, writing and spelling are easy for everyone is that dyslexics are regarded as stupid for not being able to achieve those skills so easily, and the skills they have are not recognised and celebrated so much.

    * she has had her IQ tested to have her dyslexia recognised; her IQ is high, but the very high scores in non-verbal, visual-spatial and performance IQ scores are dragged down by the much lower verbal IQ. Which is typical for dyslexia.
  • HugalHugal Shipmate
    Yes Dyslexia is a list of symptoms that will vary in intensity with each individual. Is it a different kind of intelligence (to bring it back to the thread) I would say yes. Thanks CK that has opened up this thread a bit.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I think I have the opposite of dyslexia - I have a memory for the shape of words, so very rarely make a spelling error, and once corrected, won't make it again. But it makes me have a different sort of problem where I am often just confused to see a typo, while others will easily figure out what it is supposed to say. This often happens on FB - I'll stare at a post in confusion for ages, and eventually ask what it means. Then several people tell me it's probably a typo for a certain word, and it makes sense after they tell me! I have to be careful when I don't know people though, because some people think you're asking to be snarky.

    Also, I score very high in verbal IQ, but struggle with pragmatics of language - things like knowing when something is non-literal, when I'm supposed to be reading between the lines, etc. It's one reason I liked studying literature, because then you read the criticism that draws your attention to this sort of thing, and you have plenty of time to read and reread and work it out for yourself, and it's fun, like a puzzle, but also handy for learning how it works in general.

    I think a trouble with society is people so often want to put down people they see as less intelligent than they are, or else, if a person seems more intelligent in, say, an academic way, they will find a way to sneer and being them down - 'Clever but no common sense!' for instance. But in reality, surely no one's going to have high levels of every type of skill/intelligence/whatever you want to call it, and that's okay. We are all different, we can complement each other if we accept differences, and focus on each other's strengths, rather than see it as a competition.

    (By the way, a way to remember usage of 'none' is it's short for 'not one', as in 'none of them,' or 'not any', as in 'none of your business.' It's different from putting a prefix in front of an adjective, which would have a hyphen, and no 'e': non-standard. It's also pronounced differently, at least in my accent. 'None' is pronounced like 'nun,' but 'non' rhymes with 'John.')

  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    I too have a sort of opposite of dyslexia and sometimes struggle with posts missing punctuation or containing autocorrect fails. One of the struggles I always had with learning languages was where the teacher would say "try to guess from the context." - always found that virtually impossible. But then I stand in awe of people who can follow a film or TV drama when they're not concentrating on the dialogue. I have to concentrate really hard because if I miss a bit I can't fill it in from guesswork and get utterly lost.

    Doesn't help that while I'm far from faceblind I do often think two people look the same when others don't - I've been utterly confused in films and so on when one of the characters turns out to actually be three who all looked the same to me.
  • The RogueThe Rogue Shipmate
    Why is intelligence measured and why compare two people's intelligence scores?
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Mine is measured when I take part in autism research, because they need to ensure there is not a significant difference between the non-autistic control group and the autistic participants, because that would be a confounding variable. However, I get a different score each time, because they do the same IQ test on me, and so in theory I know the answers from last time, but also sometimes I'm tired or not paying so much attention, and I guess sometimes I think of all the possible definitions of a word, and other times I don't, so my score varies, up and down, but always pretty high. With the patterns test, sometimes I select the wrong one and then moments after selecting it, I realise it's a different one, but then it's too late. It doesn't seem a terribly reliable test to me, but I find it fun, because I enjoy analysing words and finding patterns. I used to do the Mensa tests in the Readers' Digest as a kid, just for fun, because I enjoy those kinds of puzzles.
  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    Why test? to check what learning needs a child may have and identify any difficulties. Or to monitor progress of children with learning needs.
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    Fineline

    When I heard the topic title, I listened a couple of times, a bit puzzled as I could not think why a nun was involved! However, I thought, no doubt I shall work it out later.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    Heh, SusanDoris, yes, I guess it must have sounded odd. Standard intelligence for nuns, or something.

    Interestingly, I have a friend online who has been deaf all her life and her spelling errors are very different from the spelling errors of someone else I know online who has been blind nearly all his life. The deaf person's spelling errors, if you were to read them out loud, don't sound anything like the original word - they just have visual similarities, because she of course has no spoken version to hear in her head. So they'd be pretty much impossible to figure out if Synthetic Dave were reading them. But the blind person's spelling errors are phonetic - they can look very strange, but if you read them out loud, they sound exactly like the word they are supposed to be.
  • As a nonstandard form of ability, I'm perhaps excessively intuitive about patterns, particularly people when I see them directly. I get motives very easily. I also am one of those people who understands what is happening in movies and TV/Netflix series etc, which is why I'm not someone who watches that much stuff. My family thinks I also talk "dog" but I've thought that's not the same, talking to a dog is reading the quite obvious nonverbal signals.
  • I am in fact faceblind, which means that the whole world of movies and celebrities is a mystery to me. I couldn't recognize (celebrity of your choice) if you stood him in front of me 10 times a day for a year, let alone when he's in costume. And so I sound a right idiot when someone says "Did you see so-and-so in that film last month?" or similar. (If you've got a celebrity who needs humbling, introduce them to me and I'll undertake to completely miss their identity while asking them for directions to the coffee shop.)
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I've always found reading novels much easier than watching movies for this reason - always getting confused which character is which, and also my auditory processing is poor. And movies seem to rely on a lot more reading between the lines. So I've always found it odd when people seem to see reading as intellectually superior to watching movies, as if movies are the dumb version of books. There is often an attitude of sneering at people who will watch a movie rather than read the book the movie was based on. I read the book first so I'll have a better chance of understanding the movie!
  • As a nonstandard form of ability, I'm perhaps excessively intuitive about patterns, particularly people when I see them directly. I get motives very easily. I also am one of those people who understands what is happening in movies and TV/Netflix series etc, which is why I'm not someone who watches that much stuff. My family thinks I also talk "dog" but I've thought that's not the same, talking to a dog is reading the quite obvious nonverbal signals.
    I read people like books and quickly get motives, I’m very intuitive - a helpful skill when nursing and teaching.
  • HugalHugal Shipmate
    Unfortunately the films don’t always match the book. The recent film of Casino Royal is a good rewrite for the modern age. The Jason Bourne films have little to do with books and the last film was completely made up. The story of his father is just not in any of the books.
  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    I have a son-in-law who is dyslexic. He is a software engineer and he says that it is his impression that a disproportionate number of software engineers are dyslexic.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    fineline wrote: »
    There is often an attitude of sneering at people who will watch a movie rather than read the book the movie was based on. I read the book first so I'll have a better chance of understanding the movie!

    I read the book and if I like it I don't go to the movie because I will very seldom enjoy it as much as the book. I first learnt this when I saw Mary Poppins as a child and was horrified.

    I am not sneering at people who choose to go to the movie, that choice is equally valid for them, I prefer reading.

    I don't think the problem is in which approach someone prefers, but in them thinking that their preference is somehow superior.

    It isn't.
  • Gracious RebelGracious Rebel Shipmate
    edited May 1
    Fineline and KarlLB ....wow I have discovered that there are other people like me who struggle to understand the plot or work out who is who when watching a film or drama, but can deal with complex plots and larges casts of characters when reading a novel. It's the story of my life, and a source of frustration to my partner who must get tired of me asking things like 'have we seen him before?' 'what happened just then?' when watching tv!
  • chrisstileschrisstiles Shipmate
    fineline wrote: »
    There is often an attitude of sneering at people who will watch a movie rather than read the book the movie was based on. I read the book first so I'll have a better chance of understanding the movie!

    I think if either are any good they have to be evaluated as separate works in their own right.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    fineline wrote: »
    There is often an attitude of sneering at people who will watch a movie rather than read the book the movie was based on. I read the book first so I'll have a better chance of understanding the movie!

    I think if either are any good they have to be evaluated as separate works in their own right.

    Yes, I agree - movies are a completely different medium so will be very different in how they portray the characters and story, and some parts will be omitted or changed or added, for various reasons. Sometimes I think the movie is better than the book, and sometimes the book better than the movie, though that is not about whether things are changed, but more about how effective they are in their own right.

    Though this is a bit of a digression from types of intelligence, so I will try to bring it back to topic by suggesting that some people may have more of a mind for appreciating and evaluating a movie, and others more of a mind for novels. I know a lot more about than about novels than about cinema, but that is also because I studied literature. Had my mind been more inclined towards movies, I may have studied film. I have learnt a bit about film more recently, though, from working with film students.

  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    My grandson has been placed on the Autistic Spectrum. He is high functioning. He can read third grade level and he is not even in kindergarten, He likes to crack jokes and can catch irony pretty easily. However, he is a stickler for routine--he throws a fit if something is out of place. He is very sensitive to noise. And he gets overwhelmed with stimulation. He had been in a Montessori program but he would cling to just one teacher. He is the second in our family who is high functioning. The other one is through my daughter's marriage. The Portland School District is now developing an individualized program for my grandson. I would say grandson is extremely intelligent. Reminds me of Bill Gates or Young Sheldon on CBS.
  • Curiosity killedCuriosity killed Shipmate, 8th Day Host
    @fineline - there's something recognised as hyperlexia that I've encountered in children on the autism spectrum.
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