Fuck this fucking virus with a fucking farm implement.

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Comments

  • Oh hell no. If you don't get your eyes fixed (hearing fixed, teeth cleaned) it affects everybody you care for--your children, the people you serve at work, the people who encounter you on the road, the people who pick up the pieces after you have an accident or heart attack due to endocarditis (<<undealt-with tooth decay) or stroke (ditto, also uncontrolled diabetes). The neighbor who has to mow your lawn or live with the eyesore after your stroke makes it impossible for you to care for it (yes, this is a real case in the US right now, though it was cancer). Overburdened paratransit and other disability services who have to cope with you, because some dumb ass wasn't willing to put in the much smaller amount of money/effort upstream, before you became permanently disabled.

    And that's just the start.
  • RuthRuth Shipmate
    Like we could afford to live there, but I digress....

    It depends on how you want to live. I've been living in California on a working-class wage or less my whole adult life.
  • Could well be. But then, my wages as a PhD working as a proofreader (a few years ago) were just over 13$ an hour. My wages as an adjunct college instructor were probably half that. I couldn't find housing here for that amount, and I am not sanguine about going home to California.
  • Oh hell no. If you don't get your eyes fixed (hearing fixed, teeth cleaned) it affects everybody you care for [..]

    Sure, but it's a different level of connectedness.

    I'll agree with you that any time you make decisions like "we're not going to let people die in the gutter" then it becomes much cheaper to treat their problems before they get to the dying-in-the-gutter stage. Medical care free at the point of use, funded through general taxation, is just better.

    But Americans tend to be resistant to that idea.

    My point is that you can make a solid case for freely-accessible healthcare for communicable diseases even to the sort of people who dismiss subsidized insurance as raging communism.
  • Ruth wrote: »
    Oh, no doubt. Health insurance is soon (or now? I don't know) going to be required to reimburse people for up to 8 rapid covid tests a month, but that means you have to a) front the money, and b) figure out how to get reimbursed.

    Apparently, each household can now order 4 rapid tests free from the government. So I'll need to choose which of the members of my household to test, and just assume that the other household members would test the same.
  • Oh hell no. If you don't get your eyes fixed (hearing fixed, teeth cleaned) it affects everybody you care for [..]

    Sure, but it's a different level of connectedness.

    I'll agree with you that any time you make decisions like "we're not going to let people die in the gutter" then it becomes much cheaper to treat their problems before they get to the dying-in-the-gutter stage. Medical care free at the point of use, funded through general taxation, is just better.

    But Americans tend to be resistant to that idea.

    My point is that you can make a solid case for freely-accessible healthcare for communicable diseases even to the sort of people who dismiss subsidized insurance as raging communism.

    Please, please don't be lumping all Americans into the stupid category. I'm an American. There are plenty like me that see the need to care for everybody. Just because fuckers scream loudly in the media doesn't mean the rest of us want to see our neighbors go to hell medically speaking without doing anything about it.

    And really, we've had people attempting to make your case for two years now, and the loudest screaming fuckers don't care and won't listen. Because they aren't reasonable people.
  • RuthRuth Shipmate
    Could well be. But then, my wages as a PhD working as a proofreader (a few years ago) were just over 13$ an hour. My wages as an adjunct college instructor were probably half that. I couldn't find housing here for that amount, and I am not sanguine about going home to California.

    I'm not saying it would make financial sense for you to move here or that you'd be happy with your rent-to-paycheck ratio if you did. I'm saying you could "afford" to.
    My point is that you can make a solid case for freely-accessible healthcare for communicable diseases even to the sort of people who dismiss subsidized insurance as raging communism.

    I've argued this solid case to such people without changing their minds. Drug-resistant TB doesn't care whether you're in the country legally, but these folks sure do.
  • Rent where I grew up was well over 1000 a month for a studio apartment in the 80s. No doubt there are areas even within California where it is possible to live on poverty wages and not actually starve to death, but that is not what I'd call "affordable" and "livable." Nor would it be "going home." Family of three? Single income? No.

    Forgive me for getting het up over this, but I've lately had family members (with well over a million in equity) criticizing me harshly for not returning to California and living close by--and about five years ago, actually pulling a bait-and-switch on me suggesting that they'd help out, only to watch in amusement as I attempted to accept an offer they denied ever making.

    I could afford a cardboard box under an overpass in San Diego. Maybe.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    Ruth wrote: »
    Oh, no doubt. Health insurance is soon (or now? I don't know) going to be required to reimburse people for up to 8 rapid covid tests a month, but that means you have to a) front the money, and b) figure out how to get reimbursed.

    Apparently, each household can now order 4 rapid tests free from the government. So I'll need to choose which of the members of my household to test, and just assume that the other household members would test the same.

    According to this site each individual is entitled to eight tests per month. I know around here, one test per month would be hard to find right now.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    Also, it's not quite as easy for Medicare recipients. Unfortunately. :disappointed:
    At this time original Medicare cannot pay for at-home tests through this program. Medicare Advantage plans may offer coverage and payment for at-home over-the-counter COVID-19 tests, so consumers covered by Medicare Advantage should check with their plan.

    I hope this problem gets remedied for the elders who can't go out to get a script from their doctor, then go to a testing site.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    Sorry for a triple post!!

    Apparently, the site above was incorrect! One of my friends who is also on Medicare texted information for all of us old fogies to order tests to be sent to our homes. I did so and was not asked any information at all about what medical coverage I have.

    Let's see how long it takes to get these tests delivered.
  • amyboamybo Shipmate
    edited January 24
    And the preschooler has COVID. From preschool. Child is fine, but dad and I are so very angry. Here's to another week working from home with a bored child. 2 months ago I was starting to plan a 5th birthday party. Now I'm thinking a festive trip to the doctor to get the first vaccine is all we're doing.
  • amybo wrote: »
    And the preschooler has COVID. From preschool. Child is fine, but dad and I are so very angry. Here's to another week working from home with a bored child. 2 months ago I was starting to plan a 5th birthday party. Now I'm thinking a festive trip to the doctor to get the first vaccine is all we're doing.

    Ah, crap. Sorry to hear that @amybo, and I certainly sympathize with "bored kids climbing walls".
  • But...but...isn't it all over now (or will be over on 26th January)?

    Has my government been telling me lies?

    🙏 for @amybo, though, and for all the families for whom it most certainly is not over.
    :grimace:
  • But...but...isn't it all over now (or will be over on 26th January)?
    Maybe 26th January 2023.
  • O - I see...yes, They didn't specify the year...
    :disappointed:
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