Words we could do without

This discussion was created from comments split from: Today I Consign To Hell -the All Saints version.
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  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited May 18
    TICTH the growing use of the bastard terms 'ramp(ed) up', and 'uptick', both of which frequently appear in the Meeja, especially in relation to The Plague.

    Why can't They simply use that perfectly good word 'increase', or a suitable previously known synonym?
    :angry:
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited May 18
    I'll go along with that, BF! I'm not sure why, but IMNSHO "upturn" is all right, but "uptick" most definitely isn't.
  • I wonder if it's because 'uptick' is reminiscent of those horrid little bloodsucking insect things?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tick

    Or maybe I just have too much imagination...
    :grimace:
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I think it's more because I see it as business-speak, along with phrases like reach out, touch base and leverage (when used as a verb), all of which I'm inclined to avoid.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited May 18
    Yes, ISWYM.

    Churchspeak has its own terms, too, such as 'missional', but that's perhaps for another thread...

    O for plain Anglo-Saxon!
  • Piglet wrote: »
    I'll go along with that, BF! I'm not sure why, but IMNSHO "upturn" is all right, but "uptick" most definitely isn't.

    "Uptick" actually has a legitimate original meaning, coming from the device called a stock ticker that prints the value of stocks in the stock exchange. Auntie Google will tell you all about it. I agree about 'reach out' - unnecessary and plainly wrong.
  • Thx for that. I still don't like the word...but Fairy Nuff if it's a proper term...
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    That's interesting - I feel as though it's an expression I've only been aware of recently. Maybe I just don't watch the right television channels ... :confused:
  • Stay A Lert! Don't watch any TV channels!
    :wink:
  • Lily PadLily Pad Shipmate
    .........moving forward...............blech, hate that too!
  • ...thinking outside the box...
    :grey_question:
  • Well, you have to think outside the box (under the blue sky, natch) as there is an elephant in the room - not going forward (lost the roadmap) nor being ramped up (too heavy). All this, of course is unprecedented.
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    At the end of the day...
  • Where has "unsuccess" instead of "failure" come from? Does it mean something different to "failure"?
  • I have a long list of these begun when I was working back in Scotland a few years ago. May I offer 'dis-benefit'? 'de-risk'? (both from the former British Energy). The current list runs to four pages.
  • Someone wrote a letter in the Times a few years ago. They'd gone to a shop seeking a certain product only to be told that it was no longer available as it had been "de-ranged".
  • RossweisseRossweisse Hell Host, 8th Day Host
    Where has "unsuccess" instead of "failure" come from? Does it mean something different to "failure"?
    "Unsuccess" is not a word. What a horrid neologism!

  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate
    Maybe someone wanted to avoid the blame/shame that goes with "failure"?
  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    Where has "unsuccess" instead of "failure" come from? Does it mean something different to "failure"?
    "Unsuccess" is not a word. What a horrid neologism!

    Backformed from the well-established 'unsuccessful'?
  • Possibly, but unsuccessfully!
  • What a vibrant, exciting, dynamic community thread this is!
    :wink:

    I hope it won't unsucceed in its wossname...

  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    "Vibrant." Definitely "vibrant." Why anyone would want to vibrate, God knows.
  • Vibrant, growing, lively, welcoming, Bible-based, family-focussed - as per too many church websites.
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    And just what are they doing with all their vibrators?
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host, 8th Day Host
    Unsuccess means 'Lack of success, failure; an instance of this.' Its first recorded usage was by Sir Philip Sidney, in Arcadia, in 1586.

    So perhaps not a neologism. More a revival.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited May 19
    Ah! An unkilling, of a word formerly used elsewhen...
    :wink:
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    This obtains a whole other level of horror when you insert these words in a conversation in another language. "Disruptive" was already an ungood word in English business speak. Carried over into French, for example, it is appalling.
  • Oddly enough, this reincarnated discussion opens with a word that has earned a place in the ST black list:

    System: Any simple, uncomplicated, everyday object, like a can of paint or a washing line, is advertised as a system these days. Just use the word whenever you feel like it. Nobody pays any attention to it any more. It has lost its meaning.
  • Logistics (as painted on the side of lorries).
  • DafydDafyd Shipmate
    fineline wrote: »
    Unsuccess means 'Lack of success, failure; an instance of this.' Its first recorded usage was by Sir Philip Sidney, in Arcadia, in 1586.
    Important as Sidney is to the history of English literature his word choice and style are not always models to be emulated.

  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    I'm so glad other people hate uptick. I can bare to read news reports where it's been used.
  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    Dafyd wrote: »
    fineline wrote: »
    Unsuccess means 'Lack of success, failure; an instance of this.' Its first recorded usage was by Sir Philip Sidney, in Arcadia, in 1586.
    Important as Sidney is to the history of English literature his word choice and style are not always models to be emulated.

    So the consensus of this thread is that we shouldn't invent new words. And by this post we shouldn't use old ones either.

    I can see this forum becoming much quieter in the very near future, unless it stops being text-based and becomes more open to interpretive dance.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host, 8th Day Host
    Dafyd wrote: »
    fineline wrote: »
    Unsuccess means 'Lack of success, failure; an instance of this.' Its first recorded usage was by Sir Philip Sidney, in Arcadia, in 1586.
    Important as Sidney is to the history of English literature his word choice and style are not always models to be emulated.

    Heh, there may have been others, unrecorded, before him. There were others after. My point was simply that it's not new. And if it were commonly used and accepted in today's society, people would be fine with it. The issue seems more to be with it being previously unheard, and so sounding weird and wrong.
  • We have a commonly used word meaning "unsuccess" It's "failure" Why revive "unsuccess"?
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host, 8th Day Host
    No idea, as I've not even come across it, but words often come in and out of fashion. And often revived words, along with new words, have a slight variance in shades of meaning. I'd imagine there are areas between the binary opposites of failure and success, and I wouldn't assume unsuccess to mean failure, any more than I'd assume unfailure to mean success.

    Though the English language is so full of synonyms anyway, I'm not even sure why words are spurned on the basis that there's another word meaning the same. It's hardly a language characterised by simplicity and minimalism!

    I remember a lot of people grumbling about the term 'to gift' when it became popular with shops. People were saying it wasn't a real word, that it had just been invented as a sales thing, and why use 'gift' as a verb, when there is a perfectly good verb 'to give.' A few people then pointed out that 'gift' is more specific than give, as give doesn't always mean 'to give as a gift'. And that gift has been used as a verb from the 1600s, so it's hardly new. Not sure if people still have a problem with the verbing of gift, but I haven't heard anyone complain about it for years now. I've even seen some of the people who initially complained about it now happily using it!
  • Robert ArminRobert Armin Shipmate
    "Uptick" has passed me by, I'm pleased to say.

    I reserve my caution for older targets, such as "just". It is occasionally useful, but much overused (not only in prayers) so I try to omit it from my speaking and writing.
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    Fawkes Cat wrote: »
    So the consensus of this thread is that we shouldn't invent new words...
    Starting a sentence (or, worse, a paragraph) with the word "So" is a practice I could certainly do without.

    (Or "without which I could do"?)
  • ECraigRECraigR Shipmate
    Uptick is fairly banal over here, so I don't notice it. But unprecedented is rather grating.
  • "Uptick" has passed me by, I'm pleased to say.

    I reserve my caution for older targets, such as "just". It is occasionally useful, but much overused (not only in prayers) so I try to omit it from my speaking and writing.

    Really, really...?
    :wink:

  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host, 8th Day Host
    I've never heard 'uptick.' But I don't have a TV, so I think many of these vocabulary trends pass me by. I learn more of the urban dictionary type expressions, especially from working with young people. The most recent I came across is wig, which some students use a lot simply to mean 'great.'
  • Fawkes CatFawkes Cat Shipmate
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    Fawkes Cat wrote: »
    So the consensus of this thread is that we shouldn't invent new words...
    Starting a sentence (or, worse, a paragraph) with the word "So" is a practice I could certainly do without.

    (Or "without which I could do"?)

    Therefore the consensus of this thread is that we shouldn't invent new words...

    Is that better?
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    "At the end of the day..." and "proactive".
  • AIUI, "uptick" comes from the stock market, where "upticks" are price increases. The tick size is the quantization of the price of a stock, so an "uptick" is an increase in price by (at least) one tick.
  • CathscatsCathscats Shipmate
    fineline wrote: »

    I remember a lot of people grumbling about the term 'to gift' when it became popular with shops. People were saying it wasn't a real word, that it had just been invented as a sales thing, and why use 'gift' as a verb, when there is a perfectly good verb 'to give.' A few people then pointed out that 'gift' is more specific than give, as give doesn't always mean 'to give as a gift'. And that gift has been used as a verb from the 1600s, so it's hardly new. Not sure if people still have a problem with the verbing of gift, but I haven't heard anyone complain about it for years now. I've even seen some of the people who initially complained about it now happily using it!

    I once told the Kirk Session it was time to get rid of a piano so warped that it was untuneable. Up pipes one old soul, “You cannae get rid of that piano, it’s gifted.” To her gifted meant more than given. It meant given in such a way that you had to keep it in perpetuity in memory of the giver. I seem to remember that I replied along the lines of “It is given to us. Only people can be gifted.”
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    "Tasked." Why not "I've been given the task of..."?
  • HarryCHHarryCH Shipmate
    I am always irritated by "where is it at".
  • Anna_BaptistAnna_Baptist Shipmate Posts: 30
    The reality is this is the "New normal"
  • ECraigRECraigR Shipmate
    fineline wrote: »
    I've never heard 'uptick.' But I don't have a TV, so I think many of these vocabulary trends pass me by. I learn more of the urban dictionary type expressions, especially from working with young people. The most recent I came across is wig, which some students use a lot simply to mean 'great.'

    I don't own a television either, but here it on NPR and read it in the paper. Seems to be common newspeak in the US.

  • Starting sentences with "Well,,,"
    "silver lining"
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