St Margaret: discuss

I'm starting on Purg, but, Hosts, feel free to migrate this to wherever you think might be more appropriate.

I've noticed a hotel (now closed - and a shame, too, as it was quite charming) St Margaret Hotel in Bloomsbury, and I've noticed two church halls bearing her name, even though neither church bears her name. A quick dip into the Catholic Encyclopedia shows that none of the four Margarets seems to have an explicit association with hospitality, except perhaps St Margaret Clitherow, who hid Roman Catholic priests during their suppression. Is that the connection?

Comments

  • This is Bloomsbury in London, right? According to what I've been reading, Margaret Clitherow lived in York, and doesn't seem to have had much connection with London.

    That said, your theory does sound otherwise plausible. Though I wonder how likely it is that reverence for a papist conspirator would have manifested itself in the naming of a presumably respectable hotel.

    Would you happen to know when the hotel opened? And is Bloomsbury known for having a large Catholic population?
  • Is it perhaps simply a Scottish connection?

  • St Margaret of Scotland (in my very superficial research) though admirable, seems to have no connection to hospitality.

    St Margaret Clitherow had no connection to London. She did, however, shelter RC priests.

    The hotel (I stayed there three times before it closed) was run by an Italian family, so presumably they were RC. (Lovely people. The breakfast room had some beautiful glasswork - dividers with a heron on each, eating a fish). The two church halls were both Anglican, so I'm uncertain about the connection to St Margaret Clitherow, unless they were Very Anglo-Catholic.

  • Sure, but I think the word is being used on this thread in the sense of "hospitality industry". IOW hotels and maybe restaurants.
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Is it perhaps simply a Scottish connection?
    Don't think @Nick Tamen means that Margaret of Scotland has any connection with the hospitality industry, but just that there are and have ever been many exiled Scots in London, and a subtle way of showing that has been to call your home or business either St. Andrew or St. Margaret. Your hotel may well have been founded by exiled Scots before the Italians took it over, and the fact that church halls have a different name than their churches usually indicates that a union of two or more churches has taken place at some point (either with the halls of one and the sanctuary of another, or keeping the name of one alive by re-naming the halls).
  • Cathscats wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Is it perhaps simply a Scottish connection?
    Don't think @Nick Tamen means that Margaret of Scotland has any connection with the hospitality industry, but just that there are and have ever been many exiled Scots in London, and a subtle way of showing that has been to call your home or business either St. Andrew or St. Margaret.
    Yes, that’s exactly what I was thinking.

    And while I don’t know anything about the St. Margaret Hotel, it looks like the St. Margaret Hotel, Bloomsbury, website takes one to Celtic Hotel, which seems to underscore a possible Scottish connection.

  • Queen / St Margaret turns up in many different contexts in Scotland. Queen Margaret University, Queen Margaret Hospital, St Margaret hospice, lots of St Margaret churches, roads, schools etc etc. She seems to be the go-to Saint for stained glass windows dedicated to women. I am particularly fond of one in Dornoch cathedral which depicts Margaret teaching her husband, King Malcolm, to read.

    She is the "Queen" in Queensferry - she set up the original ferry to help pilgrims travelling to St Andrews.

    She is non-denominational - St Margaret's Church might be Roman Catholic, Epicopalian or Church of Scotland.
  • There's a St Margaret's church not all that far away, in the City of London (St Margaret Lothbury), but that, I understand, is dedicated to she of Antioch, and not the Scottish lady.

    @Pangolin Guerre - what were the two churches with Halls named after St Margaret?

  • A quick dip into the Catholic Encyclopedia shows that none of the four Margarets seems to have an explicit association with hospitality, except perhaps St Margaret Clitherow, who hid Roman Catholic priests during their suppression.
    There are rather more than four Margarets, but your basic point still stands. There is St. Margaret of Antioch; St. Margaret of Bourgeoys; St. Margaret Fontana; St. Margaret Clitherow; St. Margaret of Cortona; St. Margaret Mary Alacoque; St. Margaret of England; St. Margaret of Scotland; St. Margaret of Hungary and (of course) St. Margaret the Barefooted. Still none of them scream "hospitality" to me, although St. Margaret of Cortona is a patron saint of homeless people, hoboes and tramps, which is at least within spotting distance.

    The usual patron saints of Hospitality are St. Julian the Hospitaller (duh!) and St. Meinrad.
  • Sainte Marguerite Bourgeoys is, as is well known, the founder of the Congregation of Our Lady (CND), one of the largest in its day, and most powerful religious orders in Canada. She likely provided hospitality for hundreds, if not thousands in her day. However, she was not canonized until 1982, a fact I know well as I edited a document justifying the official delegation to the ceremonies in Rome, so couldn't have been the inspiration for the hotel.

    My guess is that it's Saint Margaret of Antioch, a favourite dedication in mediaeval England.
  • Sainte Marguerite Bourgeoys is, as is well known, the founder of the Congregation of Our Lady (CND),

    I just did a double-take there and briefly wondered whether the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament was actually a Roman Catholic order but decided, even given radical nuns, this was unlikely.
  • Sainte Marguerite Bourgeoys is, as is well known, the founder of the Congregation of Our Lady (CND),

    I just did a double-take there and briefly wondered whether the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament was actually a Roman Catholic order but decided, even given radical nuns, this was unlikely.

    [Silly tangent] Which reminds me of a friend who went on a demo ages ago, I think for cancelling Third World debt, and saw a group of friars holding a banner that said FRANCISCANS AGAINST POVERTY ...
  • Margaret of Antioch's actual existence is "in doubt".
    Wikipedia: "...declared apocryphal by Pope Gelasius I in 494, but devotion to her revived [in the West with the Crusades."
    (Revived as well as by my own little self in the childbearing years!)
  • All right, I am wondering if it is a reference to this society at least with the churches. I believe they were very active around London in their hey day. The priory at Walsingham that I have an acquaintance with certainly has a charism of hospitality.
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