Enough is enough

TukaiTukai Shipmate
"Enough is enough" was the dominant slogan in the rallies held across Australia on 15 March to call for action on the continuing scourge of sexual harassment and worse. The timing was set by this being the first day of the resumption of federal parliament, so the rally in Canberra (which I attended, though I'm an older white male); the featured speaker there was Brittany Higgins, a woman who was raped inside parliament house 2 years ago, but whose bosses did almost nothing to help her, focussing instead on keeping the story quiet so it did not damage the reputation of their party.
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Some of the older women there carried signs saying "why are still having to protest this shit 20 years on" , and I even saw one even stronger "my sister was murdered 20 years ago and he got off scot free".
The tone deaf response by our male Prime Minister only made it worse. Inside parliament, he gloated that our democracy is so strong that people can protest without being shot. [!!]

Question: With the #MeToo movement still strong in USA, and the outrage in the UK about Sarah Everhard (killed while walking home after work) , are we at a turning point in making progress towards real action and culture change on violence against women (or indeed gender-based violence more generally)?

Comments

  • Hopefull yes; realistically no.
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    No unfortunately
  • Agree. It should be the start of better things, but I doubt it will be.
  • No.
  • SandemaniacSandemaniac Shipmate
    edited March 19
    Not until people who abuse positions of power can be held responsible for their actions.

    So no, in short, fat chance.
  • Simon ToadSimon Toad Shipmate
    I don't think a turning point is the right way to put it. In Australia at least we are witnessing a creeping flood of change. This is perhaps a point where one island of privilege is about to be submerged.

    The engine of change in my milieu are the Catholic girls' schools and the nuns who taught there in the 1940's and 50's. They had their equivalents at PLC and other schools I suppose. But the nuns knew that the whole patriarchy thing was nonsense, and I have it on good authority that they passed that knowledge to their charges. And now the granddaughters of those charges are making some serious noise, and their daughters...they are now in positions of authority.

    I don't know where Helen Reddy went to school. Anyone know?
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Wikipedia says she went to Tintern Grammar School in Melbourne.
  • Simon ToadSimon Toad Shipmate
    Thanks BroJames. I am surprised because I grew up near that school.
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Simon Toad wrote: »
    I don't think a turning point is the right way to put it. In Australia at least we are witnessing a creeping flood of change. This is perhaps a point where one island of privilege is about to be submerged.

    The engine of change in my milieu are the Catholic girls' schools and the nuns who taught there in the 1940's and 50's. They had their equivalents at PLC and other schools I suppose. But the nuns knew that the whole patriarchy thing was nonsense, and I have it on good authority that they passed that knowledge to their charges. And now the granddaughters of those charges are making some serious noise, and their daughters...they are now in positions of authority.

    I don't know where Helen Reddy went to school. Anyone know?

    I was educated by nuns in Oz during the 50s and 60s and will have to disagree.
  • AnteaterAnteater Shipmate
    What's going on with the SNP in the UK is an sad case in point. This analysis of how abuse matters nothing to preserve political power, by Jesse Phillips (for non-UK she is a labour MP who strongly campaigns on issues of violence against women and is one of the best MPs we have) shows how far there is to go. Extract:
    But never have I seen such a series of failures as what has happened in Scotland. None of this charade is to do with making sure that the staff in Holyrood are safe, or that better processes for complaints are put in place, none of this is about women’s or workers’ rights.

    And this in an administration led by a woman. But it may be that by the letter of the law there's nothing to answer for. So the question for me is: Does the law need changing? And if so how?

    (And the Tory party is led by Shagger Boris, so for the removal of doubt, I'm not suggesting England is any better).


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