Morning & Evening Prayer

Does anyone pray morning and evening prayer at home on a regular basis?

Comments

  • Yes. I've done so (not always faithfully, though) for a long time, and especially since becoming a Benedictine oblate, which involves promising to do this.
  • It is my basic pattern. Used a variety of forms.
  • Sea Stoic wrote: »
    Does anyone pray morning and evening prayer at home on a regular basis?

    I try to. I rarely succeed in managing both now I have a toddler.
  • Quite often, a (slightly abbreviated- no Te Deum/ Benedicite unless I've got lots of time, maybe just the one psalm depending on length) 1662 Morning Prayer. Not Evening Prayer, tho'- don't really know why, because I could.
  • Yes, I pray the RC Liturgy of the Hours (Morning Prayer, Prayer during the Day, Evening Prayer, Night Prayer and Office of Readings) although sometimes I supplement it with Shane Claiborne's Common Prayer: Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals.
  • Aside from priests in the CoE, was(is) it common for lay folks to pray Morning & Evensong at home as a form of piety?
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    I know a few Catholics who do. Not sure how common it is. I try to do it, but am not organised enough to do it every day. I use the Universalis app.
  • although sometimes I supplement it with Shane Claiborne's Common Prayer: Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals.
    That looks interesting.
    fineline wrote: »
    I use the Universalis app.
    As does that.

    I used to try... I had both a Greek and Russian Orthodox prayer book I used, and was encouraged by priests as part of my spiritual life and growth to pray them. I found it very helpful. Unfortunately I've drifted away...hope to get back. At one stage I used a Benedictine prayer book also.
  • Have done for periods - of a few months to a few years - for the past 30 years. Interspersed with periods of less. (In that I always have some kind of Silent-ish Time even if it's just reading Psalms appointed for the day).

    I have done different things - BCP 1662, Shane Claiborne et al's Everyday Radicals, a Marian Office-y thingy in a little book by an Episcopalian woman priest, a podcast from some Benedictine nuns in Missouri who put up their Lauds and Vespers, some English Anglican nuns' podcast of Lauds annd Compline (SBVM, Wantage before they went to the Ordinariate without their equipment to upload).

    When the children were little I got up at 5am and went to bed at 11pm so I could pray. (Looking back, I don't know how I did it!)

    My current "thing" is the US Marine Corps Devotional Field Book. It has it's limitations but has bits and pieces from all the religions (including Islam, Buddhist, Jewish prayers) as well as RC, Protestant and Orthodox things and quotes and prayers for particular circumstances. (I swallowed my principles for 10 minutes to buy it from Amazon and paid express shipping on it too. Still cheaper than a psychologist!)

    My attitude to Daily Devotions these days is that whatever I manage to do it's infinitely more than nothing at all and not to be too hard on myself. (Or not to get too religious about it!!)
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    Most mornings during Advent, before dawn I sit with an antiphon or just a single word for an hour. In recent years, contemplative prayer has helped me draw me closer to God. I attend daily Mass as often as possible and arrive early for some time to pray in silence or reflect on the readings.

    At night, I'm often too tired to do more than read some of the Office from Universalis. A Shipmate here suggested Pray As You Go and I listen to that some evenings. Each Saturday morning I go to the local church and sit after Mass for two hours of intercessory prayer, often with others who like the shared quiet.
  • I have the C of E Daily Prayer app. I don't use it as often as I would (should?) like but I do sometimes say Morning/Evening prayer in the car when I arrive/just before I leave work. Good way to get ready for work and get over the commute or put the day in perspective ready for home!
  • Jengie JonJengie Jon Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    Sea Stoic

    A number of people are here. This is not the first thread, one fairly recent from the old boards. The answer to whether lay people do this, is more than you expect although not the majority.
    Climacus wrote: »
    fineline wrote: »
    I use the Universalis app.
    As does that.

    As part of my prayer, I use both the app and the Kindle version. I must admit the app is reluctant, I like the ebook but it does make certain prayers easier. Its big downside is that it on my mobile phone which means I always risk the beep of an incoming email.

  • Jengie Jon wrote: »
    Sea Stoic

    A number of people are here. This is not the first thread, one fairly recent from the old boards. The answer to whether lay people do this, is more than you expect although not the majority.

    Thank you Jengie Jon

  • Yes, I use evening prayer service each night, I do free form prayers in the morning as I walk the dog.
  • Despite being a Baptist (see Shipname) I use the Daily Prayer app Morning and Evening six days a week (Never on a Sunday). Quite often in a toilet cubicle at work so I don't get interrupted.
  • By subscribing to such a publication as MAGNIFICAT based on the lectionary and issued monthly, I say a form of Morning & Evening Prayer, more or less daily.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    I know that several of our congregation use the Franciscan Office for MP/EP at home, as they are members of the Third Order.

    One young lady uses a short form of an Office from the Roman Catholic Church, though I'm not sure exactly what it is - it may be the one referred to by Eclesiastical Fipfop - and sometimes (if the building is open) says it quietly in church during her lunch-break.

    (BTW, we used the Franciscan Office publicly in church every day during our previous incumbent's time).

    For personal use, I actually prefer the 1662 BCP, but shortened (illegally!) to omit the Venite, one of the readings, and the Te Deum.
    :flushed:

    Please don't burn me....
  • Well, you have easy access to flame-quenching water ...
  • Not if they've tied my hands behind my back......
    :anguished:
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    So you'll singe first, then drown ...

    Worthy of an entry in Foxe's Book of Martyrs, methinks. (Or was that the Other Lot?)
  • I know that several of our congregation use the Franciscan Office for MP/EP at home, as they are members of the Third Order.

    One young lady uses a short form of an Office from the Roman Catholic Church, though I'm not sure exactly what it is - it may be the one referred to by Eclesiastical Fipfop - and sometimes (if the building is open) says it quietly in church during her lunch-break.

    (BTW, we used the Franciscan Office publicly in church every day during our previous incumbent's time).

    For personal use, I actually prefer the 1662 BCP, but shortened (illegally!) to omit the Venite, one of the readings, and the Te Deum.
    :flushed:

    Please don't burn me....

    Funny, I sometimes try to omit the Venite, but can't- it just feels like a natural way of flowing into the office. I do usually omit the Te Deum/ Benedicite, but again, can't seem to omit the Benedictus, except occasionally that I use the alternative, Ps 100.
  • I know that several of our congregation use the Franciscan Office for MP/EP at home, as they are members of the Third Order.

    One young lady uses a short form of an Office from the Roman Catholic Church, though I'm not sure exactly what it is - it may be the one referred to by Eclesiastical Fipfop - and sometimes (if the building is open) says it quietly in church during her lunch-break.

    (BTW, we used the Franciscan Office publicly in church every day during our previous incumbent's time).

    For personal use, I actually prefer the 1662 BCP, but shortened (illegally!) to omit the Venite, one of the readings, and the Te Deum.
    :flushed:

    Please don't burn me....

    In 1662, the whole of the Venite is prescribed for use, but presumably, Bishops Finger leaves out all of it. According to 1928 PB revision (popularly used, but not sanctioned) and since then, it became permissible to omit the last few verses - after verse 7 if I am right, ending with "..... we are the people of His pasture and the sheep of his hand." But I write from memory and I will have to check whether it became permissible to leave out the whole Venite except on Sundays (and on Holy Days?).

  • Not sure about that either, but yes, I leave out the whole of the Venite. The Benedictus, being the Gospel Canticle, linking OT and NT, as it were, is always included.
  • Long years ago, when I was a choirboy, Sung Matins took place once a month. Those final verses of the Venite were always left out. For some reason, the Benedictus was never used - the Jubilate being the invariable canticle following the second lesson. When the Benedicite seasonally replaced the Te Deum, it was sung to Goldsmith's shortened - "Praise Him and magnify Him for ever" after every third verse.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    Well, the short version of the Benedicite is a good idea, and quite enjoyably singable IMHO (but why is Benedicite thought to be suitable for Lent, anyway?).

    The final verses of the Venite always seem IMHO to be superfluous, at least as part of Matins. OK, I guess, if you're singing/saying it as the Psalm of the day.

    Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE!

    I still await transport to the Stake. Or the Water.
  • I suppose the Te Deum is too joyful for Lent (and Advent?) and with the Benedicite being the only alternative, it became normal practice to use it in the penitential seasons.

    In some places, the final verses of the Venite may be included in the penitential seasons but left out during the rest of the year.

    "Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE!" - if anyone is suggesting otherwise, that isn't me!
  • Yes. I say MP daily from the TEC BCP, use psalm and OT and Gospel appointed for the day and tend to stick to the Isaiah canticles. In any of the psalms I tend to change the third person references to God into second person (“You have spoken” vs “The God of Gods has spoken” or, in the Venite “The sea is yours for you made it” and so on ). Used to do EP as well when I was an Associate of a religious order, but that fell by the wayside with work and home duties. Now in retirement that holds true.
  • I still await transport to the Stake. Or the Water.

    If you're lashed to the stake and then thrown in the water, you might float.

    Face down.
  • When the Benedicite seasonally replaced the Te Deum, it was sung to Goldsmith's shortened - "Praise Him and magnify Him for ever" after every third verse.

    I believe the shortenings of the Benedicite were made licit by the 1928 Proposed Book. Several wonderful choral settings make use of them; I like Sumsion's and Harris's.
  • Leaving aside the rightness or wrongness of shortening the Benedicite, it would rejoice my heart to hear the Goldsmith setting sung once again.
  • I still await transport to the Stake. Or the Water.

    If you're lashed to the stake and then thrown in the water, you might float.

    Face down.

    I really would prefer not to have either experience!
    :flushed:

    "Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE!" - if anyone is suggesting otherwise, that isn't me!

    No, indeed - I wasn't pointing the finger, or handing you over to the Liturgical Police, but just making a (possibly) heretical observation.

  • I don't know whether it's the capitals, but I keep misreading "infallible" as "inflatable", and I'm now wondering if I've come up with a new money spinner for the Shop of Fools: a range of blow-up liturgists and theologians from a range of times, places and traditions.
  • I still await transport to the Stake. Or the Water.

    If you're lashed to the stake and then thrown in the water, you might float.

    Face down.

    I really would prefer not to have either experience!
    :flushed:

    "Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE!" - if anyone is suggesting otherwise, that isn't me!

    No, indeed - I wasn't pointing the finger, or handing you over to the Liturgical Police, but just making a (possibly) heretical observation.

    Thanks for clarification.

  • I suppose the Te Deum is too joyful for Lent (and Advent?) and with the Benedicite being the only alternative, it became normal practice to use it in the penitential seasons.

    In some places, the final verses of the Venite may be included in the penitential seasons but left out during the rest of the year.

    "Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE!" - if anyone is suggesting otherwise, that isn't me!

    I was taught that the Te Deum for the Offices is liturgically equivalent to the Gloria in the Eucharist, and therefore since the Gloria is omitted during Advent and Lent, thus so the Te Deum.

    During Advent, the suitable canticle, at least in the Canadian 1962 BCP, would be the Surge Illuminare, "Arise Shine, your light has come." I favor using the Song of Manasseh or the Second Song of Isaiah (Isaiah 55:6-11) from the US 1979 BCP for Lent.
  • TheOrganistTheOrganist Shipmate
    edited January 1
    <snip>In some places, the final verses of the Venite may be included in the penitential seasons but left out during the rest of the year.

    "Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE!" - if anyone is suggesting otherwise, that isn't me!

    I agree that Cranmer should not be regarded as "infallible" since infallibility is a doctrine of Another Denomination.

    However, if a church describes as service as MP (or Matins) according to the BCP then the whole of the Venite should be sung. Similarly, those churches that think it OK to leave out prayers for the sovereign and royal family are at fault.

    But then at our place we still have The Litany from time to time... :grin:
  • Well, yes, and, to be fair, our not-much-lamented Fr F**kwit did do BCP Matins on Sundays by the book. Mind you, sometimes he was the only one present....

    We still have BCP Matins most Sundays, though it is not now advertised on our website, as it occasionally gets omitted or cancelled.

    It's usually attended these days by just our Madam Sacristan, and my faithful fellow Blue-Scarfed-Menace, so it'll be interesting to see if our new priest wishes to continue with it.

    It might be a useful addition to our regular schedule, I think, if we could be assured of some extra support. The relatively early hour of 930am perhaps may not help, but any input from the local cadre of the Prayer Book Society is, alas, conspicuous by its absence.

    IOW, I see this as a separate, stand-alone, service, with perhaps some plainsong for the Canticles, and an Office Hymn, for those who, for whatever reason, might not be able to come to the 1030am Parish Mass.

    In which case, shortening the BCP service might not be desirable.

  • Fr here has offered to do Matins at 10:00 a.m. (i.e. an hour before the Sung Mass at 11:00 a.m.). It would be said but by the book and the intention would be that some would come and use the half hour or so between it and the start of Mass for private devotions. So far he has had no takers. We do have evensong at 5:00 p.m. before 6:00 p.m. Said Mass. Numbers are growing for that but slowly. We might get into double figures sometime around 2025.
  • venbedevenbede Shipmate
    Sea Stoic wrote: »
    Aside from priests in the CoE, was(is) it common for lay folks to pray Morning & Evensong at home as a form of piety?

    Yes. I can't quote examples, but family prayers - with the servants - were certainly standard in literature of the C18 and C19 and in some families would have taken the basis of the BCP
  • Family prayer was encouraged among Puritans see Henry Matthew A Church in the Home.
  • The American Venite concludes with some verses of Psalm 96 in rite 1, and concludes with "Oh that today you would hearken to his voice" in rite 2.
  • ...Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE! ...
    Close enough...

  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    .

    "Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE!" - if anyone is suggesting otherwise, that isn't me!

    Wash your virtual mouth out with soap!
  • Rossweisse wrote: »
    ...Cranmer was NOT INFALLIBLE! ...
    Close enough...

    Not infallible. But still a bloody genius and light years ahead of many (most?) modern liturgists.

    It saddens me when clergy I know talk dismissively about Cranmer and his liturgies and approvingly of "with it" liturgies that are wordy, clunky and just plain dull.
  • RublevRublev Shipmate
    Yes, it was a great gift to the Anglican church to replace the monastic cycle of daily offices with morning and evening prayer which are accessible to everyone.

    'Prayer should be the key of the day and the lock of the night' (George Herbert).
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    Rublev wrote: »
    Yes, it was a great gift to the Anglican church to replace the monastic cycle of daily offices with morning and evening prayer which are accessible to everyone. .

    And in their own language too!

    Aside: I personally think the CofE was the first Indigenous Theology
  • RublevRublev Shipmate
    I have never thought of it before but BCP was originally a radical Fresh Expression. At least we don't burn people at the stake for Messy Church.
  • Now THERE'S an idea!
  • Rublev wrote: »
    At least we don't burn people at the stake for Messy Church.
    But the idea is tempting 😉
  • PDRPDR Shipmate
    I have read Evening Prayer almost every night for 35 years, and Morning Prayer joined it when I was at seminary 26/7 years ago. I have gone through phases 1662, ASB, back to 1662, then a stretch on the US 1928, and all that before I got to the mandatory Anglo-Catholic phase which saw me resort to the Roman LOTH, followed by a diversion to the Anglican Breviary. I got sick of that (and Anglo-Catholicism) and went back to the BCP. The BCP tends to be the one that sticks around with me. I doubt if I have every made a full year on any of the alternatives in one go.

    The Daily Office is the mainspring of what bit of piety I can muster, and I can get tetchy if I don't get to read the Office at my usual times (11am and 9pm.) This quirk is well-enough known that if I am being particularly obnoxious or cranky, Mrs. PDR, and also her best friend will ask 'have you read Matins/Evensong?'

    I am tuned into the Eucharist in the same way. I realised when I got back from vacation a couple of years ago that I had not received or celebrated for three weeks, and had not even realised. The odd thing about that is that I usually celebrate every Sunday, and usually once or twice in the week, and you would have thought that something would have alerted me to the fact I was not on my usual routine.
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