Ship of Fools: St Patrick's, Saul, Northern Ireland


imageShip of Fools: St Patrick's, Saul, Northern Ireland

The Archbishop of Canterbury evokes pure spiritual delight at St Patrick's church on St Patrick's Day

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Comments

  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Things I don't understand. It was Church of Ireland Prayer Book Communion service, but there were Benedictine monks there chanting, including the preacher, and the Archbishop of Canterbury was distributing communion. Why?
  • Have a look at the *More Church Info* section - this was a special service, with many visitors (including the monks and the ABC!).
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Have a look at the *More Church Info* section - this was a special service, with many visitors (including the monks and the ABC!).

    A-ha!
  • SpikeSpike Admin
    Alan29 wrote: »
    Things I don't understand. It was Church of Ireland Prayer Book Communion service, but there were Benedictine monks there chanting, including the preacher, and the Archbishop of Canterbury was distributing communion. Why?

    Some Benedictines are Anglican
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Spike wrote: »
    Alan29 wrote: »
    Things I don't understand. It was Church of Ireland Prayer Book Communion service, but there were Benedictine monks there chanting, including the preacher, and the Archbishop of Canterbury was distributing communion. Why?

    Some Benedictines are Anglican

    Indeed. These weren't. It was an ecumenical matter.
  • Thank you, Father Jack!
    :wink:

    Seriously, though, it must have been quite an enjoyable occasion.
  • I lived in Ireland for much of the 1970s and had many contacts in the CoI in the north---- such an event would have been nigh-unbelievable at that period. It is moving to read of the presence of the Benedictines at a CoI eucharist.
  • Indeed. Times have changed, and, in this case, for the better. Where there's a will, and all that...
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Yes, indeed. One assumes that the monks closed their eyes or looked the other way during the Great Thanksgiving and Consecration. We've seen similar in Sydney even, but perhaps better not to give details.
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Gee D wrote: »
    Yes, indeed. One assumes that the monks closed their eyes or looked the other way during the Great Thanksgiving and Consecration. We've seen similar in Sydney even, but perhaps better not to give details.

    Or silently concelebrated?
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Perhaps, perhaps - but stretching out a hand at the right time is not noisy either.
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