Haggis and Hangovers - Scotland 2024

PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
Hello, and a happy new year to one and all. I hope you all enjoyed your steak pies/black bun/whisky (delete as appropriate) and are feeling not too fragile!
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Comments

  • DardaDarda Shipmate
    Was introduced to black bun when staying in Scotland over Christmas / New Year a few years ago, but it seems impossible to find in south west England
  • Darda wrote: »
    Was introduced to black bun when staying in Scotland over Christmas / New Year a few years ago, but it seems impossible to find in south west England
    Do you have an Edinburgh Woollen Mill shop? They sometimes stock it.

  • Darda wrote: »
    Was introduced to black bun when staying in Scotland over Christmas / New Year a few years ago, but it seems impossible to find in south west England
    Do you have an Edinburgh Woollen Mill shop? They sometimes stock it.

    I thought EWM had gone bust.
  • It went into administration but was bought out.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I only ever remember black bun as something Mum made for Hogmanay; as I recall, I wasn't all that keen on it, but it was before I'd developed a taste for rich fruit cake.

    I only put steak pie in the OP as it seems to be a traditional New Year food in this part of Scotland.

    It wasn't when I was growing up - what I most associate with New Year's Day is a baked ham, glazed with mustard and brown sugar, Dauphinoise potatoes and cabbage with juniper: my mum, who was an excellent cook, was a disciple of the blessèd Delia. :smiley:
  • Baptist TrainfanBaptist Trainfan Shipmate
    edited January 2
    My wife is Scottish (Clydebank). On New Year's Eve we had steak pie, yesterday we had ham, mash and (red) cabbage.
  • We English are happy to consume STEAK PIE at any time of year. It so happens that I have one in the fridge, ready for Thursday...
    :yum:
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    We had steak pie yesterday.
  • Mine has to be etten by Thursday. BAKED SPUD to accompany it, I think, perhaps with some Pickled RED CABBAGE.
    :yum:

    An Expotition to Tess Coe is planned for tomorrow (Storm Henk permitting), and, inspired by this thread, I may well look out for some Haggis. The store has been revamped, with new cabinets, and a greater range of certain items - I'll be looking for Haggis Slices, rather than a whole one.
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    According to STV, 80% of Scots eat a steak pie on either 31 Dec or 1 Jan. 80% seems rather high to me!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Mmm ... haggis ... 🙂

    I noticed there was some in Tessie's between Christmas and New Year, and thought about getting some, but realised I didn't really have the space at the moment.

    I will get some at some point though - haggis and clapshot is a dish fit for a king.
  • We had turkey and ham pie on NY day, but that was entirely coincidence.
  • Well, I went to Tess Coe today, and (of course) completely forgot about the Haggis until I was in the car on the way home. Next week, maybe...
    :disappointed:
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Popping in to wish everyone a happy Burns Night.

    I was at the church Burns Supper last Friday (deep fried haggis and chips from the chippy next door, and very nice it was too), but today I betook myself to Tesco's and bought ready-to-heat haggis & clapshot with whisky cream sauce, heated it and ate it, toasting the Bard as I did so.

    The only thing that could have improved it would have been rather more of it ... :mrgreen:
  • As we had both neep and parsnip that needed eating up (the rest of the neep had been partaken of for St Andrew's day!), ours went down the batch with a coarse neep and parsnip mash rather than spuds. It was actually rather tasty, I'll have to remember that.
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    I went to the butchers to buy one this morning, to find that they had sold out and were busy making more. "They've been flying out the door" the butcher told me, which was a nice mental image.

    I bought one, still warm, in the afternoon. We had it with neeps and tatties for dinner.

    I also made a chocolate haggis for today's church Drop In, which went down well. It included sultanas which had been soaked in whisky. One lady told me that I'd put in too much whisky for her liking, but the general view seemed to be that there is no such thing as Too Much Whisky.

    The NE Man is miffed that he didn't get any, so I might make another.
  • kingsfoldkingsfold Shipmate
    edited January 26
    I also made a chocolate haggis for today's church Drop In, which went down well. It included sultanas which had been soaked in whisky. One lady told me that I'd put in too much whisky for her liking, but the general view seemed to be that there is no such thing as Too Much Whisky.

    The NE Man is miffed that he didn't get any, so I might make another.

    I seem to recall that using whisky in cooking previously generated a certain amount of discussion in the NE household as to which whisky it was acceptable to use for cooking, and which was to be drunk only....

    If you need to make another chocolate haggis for the NE Man, enquiring minds want to know if he wants the posh stuff in his pud! :naughty:

  • Jane RJane R Shipmate
    edited January 26
    My foodie friends always say 'if you wouldn't drink it you shouldn't cook with it.' They were talking about wine, but surely the same rule applies to whisky?

    Love the sound of the chocolate haggis, I might try making that next Burns night.
  • Jane R wrote: »
    My foodie friends always say 'if you wouldn't drink it you shouldn't cook with it.' They were talking about wine, but surely the same rule applies to whisky?
    I can't say. But I like beer-battered fried fish even though I dislike beer as a drink.

  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    The which whisky did you use? discussion has happened again. This time I told him, truthfully, that I didn't know because I'd just used the nearest one.
  • The which whisky did you use? discussion has happened again. This time I told him, truthfully, that I didn't know because I'd just used the nearest one.

    :lol: I did suspect it might!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    edited January 26
    @North East Quine - would you maybe post the chocolate haggis recipe upstairs - I'm intrigued! :)
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    It's a Foodie Quine recipe. You can find it on the Foodie Quine's Facebook page - it's one of the 12 Haggis recipes.

    I'm not sure if I can post it on the Heaven thread? Maybe with attribution?
  • Celtic KnotweedCeltic Knotweed Shipmate
    edited January 26
    Wandered over this way to make the same request of @North East Quine that @Piglet just has. I suspect the maternal Knotweed would be interested... (parental Knotweeds did not have haggis last night, as tonight is the college Burns Supper).
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I've just googled the Foodie Quine - what delicious looking recipes! Will definitely bear her in mind next year. :)
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Admin, 8th Day Host
    Likewise, then got diverted by chocolate salami
  • It's a Foodie Quine recipe. You can find it on the Foodie Quine's Facebook page - it's one of the 12 Haggis recipes.

    Since I'm not on Facebook, I did some searching and found her non-Facebook page, it's on there as well. :smile: Might have a bash at it over the weekend if I find the time.
  • Going with friends to a Burns supper at a Scottish country dancing club this evening, but unwisely took my kilt in for some minor repairs only a few days ago. I got it back this morning, and far from being too tight at the waist as it had been, it now suffers fatal gravitational effects. You don't need any more details, but we are trying to work out a damage control strategy. Fortunately, I do not dance.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Like most Brits of a certain vintage, I'm now being reminded of an episode of Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em in which Frank Spencer learns Scottish country dancing and goes to a ceilidh ... in a kilt ... :mrgreen:
  • We had some leftover haggis, neeps and tattie from Thursday. My wife mixed them with a whipped egg, formed them into patties, and friend them. This was accompanied by fried onions and mushrooms (and Irn-Bru). Very tasty!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    That does sound nice - it would make it worth while buying more than you need so that you could make them!

    We had friends over for Hogmanay when we were in Fredericton and as well as haggis (made by me) and clapshot (made by David) we did a small baked ham - just in case our guests decided they didn't like the haggis. Afterwards I made Leftover SOUP with the clapshot and ham; I think the haggis was all eaten.
  • I had barely mentioned to a friend near Glasgow that we might be there in early May, and he e-mailed right back to say he'd got tickets for West Side Story with the RSNO and SNJO. Good thing we could still get flights, which we did in haste. We didn't get back at all last year and some of us have been experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms. It's a swine about Calmac no longer being included in the rail passes after April - we always made good use of the ferries. I wonder what else will be different this year?
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    I had a Clootie Dumpling scone yesterday, and it was very good!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Good heavens - I haven't had a clootie dumpling in years! :)
  • SarasaSarasa All Saints Host
    What exactly is a clootie dumpling and how can you turn it into a scone?
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    It's a sort of fruit pudding that's boiled or steamed in a cloth (or "cloot", hence the name).

    https://bakingwithgranny.co.uk/recipe/clootie-dumpling/
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    edited March 24
    Not to be confused with Auld Clootie who is the Devil. Although there the derivation is given as cloot = the cleft of a hoof.*

    But I think cloot/clout (n'er cast a) is the more extant meaning.

    *cf the Dutch and Afrikaans 'kloof' meaning a ravine.
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    The scone was, I think, just a standard fruit scone with Clootie Dumpling spices.

    Piglet's recipe misses out one ingredient, Sarasa. The silver sixpence! The sixpence is wrapped in greaseproof paper, and it's lucky to be the person who finds it in their slice.

    Needless to say, there was no silver sixpence in my scone!
  • SarasaSarasa All Saints Host
    Sounds a bit like spotted dick, one of my favourite puddings when growing up.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I'd forgotten about the sixpence tradition (doesn't it apply to Christmas puddings as well?); I just Googled and took the first recipe that came up.
  • Reminds me of "pudding in a rag", an old Lancs favourite, usually meat and potato, boiled in a cloth. Absolutely ******* horrible.
  • Reminds me of "pudding in a rag", an old Lancs favourite, usually meat and potato, boiled in a cloth. Absolutely ******* horrible.

    Not the way My Old Mum did it - we sometimes had such a delicious pudding for Sunday lunch, and I can still envisage the kitchen and living-room full of steam from the great boiling...
  • I think they used fatty meat, not good, but cheap, after the war. Probably skirt.
  • Piglet wrote: »
    I'd forgotten about the sixpence tradition (doesn't it apply to Christmas puddings as well?); I just Googled and took the first recipe that came up.

    Sixpence? I was once invited to a Christmas dinner in Aberdeen and was the lucky winner of a silver threepenny bit in the pudding. (I still have it).
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    edited April 22
    The Today programme on Radio 4 has just included a section on "Music to Movement" radio programmes from the past. The example of schools programming given encouraged small children to "pretend they were on a country walk" to the the tune The Ball of Kirriemuir!

    The NE Man and I were chorusing over our breakfast If you can't get f****d on a Saturday night, you'll never get f****d at all!

    It's not the way we expected our Monday morning to start.
  • SarasaSarasa All Saints Host
    The Today programme on Radio 4 has just included a section on "Music to Movement" radio programmes from the past. The example of schools programming given encouraged small children to "pretend they were on a country walk" to the the tune The Ball of Kirriemuir!

    I don't know about the lyrics but I mentioned 'Music to Movement' to my husband and we've been wandering round the kitchen pretending to be trees, and reminiscing about bean bags and those plastic balls with holes in that really hurt if you got hit by one.

  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    The Today programme on Radio 4 has just included a section on "Music to Movement" radio programmes from the past. The example of schools programming given encouraged small children to "pretend they were on a country walk" to the the tune The Ball of Kirriemuir!

    The NE Man and I were chorusing over our breakfast If you can't get f****d on a Saturday night, you'll never get f****d at all!

    It's not the way we expected our Monday morning to start.

    That is hilarious.
  • North East QuineNorth East Quine Purgatory Host
    @Sarasa, maybe there's an English folk song with the same tune, but here it's so widely known as the tune of The Ball of Kirriemuir (aka Four and Twenty Virgins) that I imagine there were Scots up and down the country choking over their cornflakes.
  • Alan Cresswell Alan Cresswell Admin, 8th Day Host
    I just saw this in Sainsbury's and need an opinion raspberry ripple Irn-Bru
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