Cancer SUCKS

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  • Mate
  • No words GG. Just continued prayers for...whatever is needed
  • Amen.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    My prayers continue for Mrs. Gamma, Galilit, and Dormouse, among others. Cancer is the devil.

    A kind friend came over this evening, rummaged as directed downstairs (whence I have not been able to go for seven weeks), and found the c. 1810 family tartan so I can wear it over my choir robes for Sunday's Kirkin'. I am so very blessed.

  • You are so very a blessing.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    Thank you!
  • Thank you for the prayers...I hope I no longer need them (for my cancer, that is!) I finished radiotherapy in August and have been back at work since the beginning of October. I have a check up mammogram in January and various appointments with specialists, but I hope that I am clear of cancer now.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    Prayers of thanks ascending both for beating the monster and for your very good health in future, Dormouse.
  • May I please ask what the experience of a Kirkin looks like?
    Google paints a picture - but not an experience.

    And it is lovely to see cancer shown the dor, mouse.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    {{{Gamma and Mrs. Gamaliel}}}

    And praise and thanksgiving for Dormouse.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    Patdys wrote: »
    May I please ask what the experience of a Kirkin looks like?
    Google paints a picture - but not an experience. ...
    Kirkin' of the Tartans is now the one time per year that we have Morning Prayer as the principal Sunday service. Those who have them wear their tartans, in whatever form. There is a pipe band, which leads the choir and clergy in and out, plays "Amazing Grace" in a version not found in the Hymnal, and performs music for the anthem.

    A person clad in Highland regalia (sometimes that person has been me) reads an introduction with the reasons for the Kirkin' (the American Episcopal Church needed Scottish bishops to consecrate bishops, as the English bishops, with their oath of loyalty to the King, were unavailable), the history of the tartan, the roll of clans, and a poem.

    It's fun, but I like pipe bands much better in the out of doors.


  • Good news Dormouse.

    I don't want to worry you but that's where we were about 4 years ago. The radiotherapy did the job only for the cancer to come back in a less detectable form. It was a mass rather than a lump.

    By the time they detected it the cancer had become secondary and spread to Mrs G's liver, pelvis and spine. There was nothing they could do to cure it, only contain it.

    It wasn't anyone's 'fault' but it sneaked back in under the radar. I'm sure you'll have regular checks and scans.

    I hope it has cleared. We were mightily relieved when Mrs G's cleared only for it to come back with a vengeance. Be vigilant but not paranoid.

    I feel awkward posting this. I don't wish to cause anxiety or alarm. Primary cancers can be shown the door. Let's hope and pray that it is thrown out and stays out.
  • I understand, GG. Nobody knows what will happen, and I could be one of the lucky ones who never has cancer again, or I could be like your wife. My heart cries for you both. It's part of the lottery that is this life, wonderful and shitty in equal (or unequal) measures. I hope and pray I will be in the first group, but I will just have to face it if I'm not.
  • Yes. I know several people who have been clear of it for years. I hope and pray for the same in your case.

    Peace.
  • Dormouse wrote: »
    I understand, GG. Nobody knows what will happen, and I could be one of the lucky ones who never has cancer again, or I could be like your wife. My heart cries for you both. It's part of the lottery that is this life, wonderful and shitty in equal (or unequal) measures. I hope and pray I will be in the first group, but I will just have to face it if I'm not.
    The first time I had cancer (31 years ago) I found that I didn't think about problems in everyday work, I just thought how lucky I was to be alive, and when it was time for a check-up, I sort of prepared myself for possible not good news. This gradually fades of course and, although I have not thought every day how lucky I am, it is there in the background. This time around, I do not worry about it, since it is being controlled by Letrozole, and I have already passed my sell-by date! *biggrin* Every Thursday I think: Right, tapdancing, hooray!!
  • It is, I think, that sort of Positive Attitude which may well not beat the Big C in the end, but at least helps cope with it!

    Well done, y'all, and prayers ascending.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    {{{GG}}}

    We take it one day at a time. We continue to make plans. We continue to see friends. I continue to work, although just half-time. Cancer impinges on our lives, and it may well take us in the end, but it's going to have to work for it.

  • Rossweisse wrote: »
    Patdys wrote: »
    May I please ask what the experience of a Kirkin looks like?
    Google paints a picture - but not an experience. ...

    ........

    A person clad in Highland regalia (sometimes that person has been me) reads an introduction with the reasons for the Kirkin' (the American Episcopal Church needed Scottish bishops to consecrate bishops, as the English bishops, with their oath of loyalty to the King, were unavailable), the history of the tartan, the roll of clans, and a poem.

    It's fun, but I like pipe bands much better in the out of doors.


    And on this side of the pond, we have the other side of the coin. St Andrews Cathedral in Aberdeen has the Bishop Seabury Memorial, where Seabury was consecrated. The ceiling is beautifully decorated with the crests of the American states, there is an American flag, and generally, a celebration of all things American.

  • Thank you all.
    It is truly good to hear how the good is celebrated.

    And two days before mum's anniversary, my dad's memory/dementia has got to the point where he no longer remembers. Mum has missed so many good things with my children.
    It is a pensive* time.
    My prayers for those hurting, those wondering and those celebrating. And all three.
    And my hope in a God who shares it all with us.

    *melancholy and a bit shit.
  • Amen.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    edited November 2018
    And on this side of the pond, we have the other side of the coin. St Andrews Cathedral in Aberdeen has the Bishop Seabury Memorial, where Seabury was consecrated. The ceiling is beautifully decorated with the crests of the American states, there is an American flag, and generally, a celebration of all things American.
    Oh, that's nice. Thank you!

    Patdys, I am so sorry.

  • Changing the subject somewhat, a well-meaning retired vicar emailed me the other day saying that he'd felt a 'strong compulsion' to offer to loan us copies of a DVD by Ty Bollinger, 'The Truth about Cancer.'

    It'd 'opened' the eyes of his wife and himself, he claimed. They'd been having to deal with cancer in the family, which seems to have been sorted out now, thanks to surgery rather than the kind of nutritional and natural/alternative cures touted by Bollinger and his ilk.

    I must admit, I resisted an equally strong impulse to email him back saying, 'And I feel an equally strong compulsion to tell you to sod right off ...'

    ;)

    More seriously, I don't doubt that there's something in alternative medicine, holistic medicine and so on - but in conjuction with more conventional forms. Both / and, not either / or (now where have I heard that before?).

    Has anyone heard of this Ty Bollinger and his theories? Is it dangerous quackery or is there something in it?
  • RooKRooK Admin Emeritus
    Has anyone heard of this Ty Bollinger and his theories?

    Well, his having an angry entry in RationalWiki on the first page of Google results is rarely a good sign. I'd never heard of "health freedom" before, but a quick read on it is horrifying. Such blatant preying on the desperate is heartbreaking.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    RooK wrote: »
    ...Such blatant preying on the desperate is heartbreaking.
    Wow. I wondered where the crap about "essential oils" was coming from (a woman in my cancer group eschewed chemo and rubbed essential oils over the area of her tumor instead; we haven't seen her in quite a while), but that really is evil.



  • Yes, Rook, I found the RationalWiki entry. There are other critiques besides. It does look worrying.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    I started yet another round of radiation today, the first of ten sessions. Everyone in that department knows me, and said hi. There's something both reassuring and saddening in that.

  • Yeah, I am also kinda weirded out by the fact that my now-metastatic breast cancer has become a lifestyle rather than an illness.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    Talk about "lifestyle choices"...
  • Mrs G is struggling now. She's in constant discomfort and whoozy with the pain-killers.

    I read to her each evening and then read a few Psalms or prayers from the service books - depending on how much either of us can bear.

    I vary the pattern but Compline from Common Prayer is emerging as the one we appreciate most.

    Mrs G' tells me that she's in a place of peace. She is prepared to go now whenever the time comes.

    She can't take much more. I am expecting her to opt for the chemo to cease and for the palliative phase to commence, the alleviation of symptoms and discomfort to the extent that this is possible.

    I am expecting the end to come within weeks rather than months. We are resigned to this. 'The Lord gaveth and the Lord taketh away. Blessed be the name of the Lord.'

  • I'm so sorry GG. May you both be surrounded by peace.
  • Oh GG I weep with you.
  • Praying for you all.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host
    Sitting here, crying for you and your dear wife, Gamma Gamaliel.
  • So sorry, GG.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Peace be with you both, Gamma Gamaliel.

    Compline rocks!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    {{{GG and Mrs. GG}}}
  • RooKRooK Admin Emeritus
    Fuck. Fuck. Fuck.
  • OhherOhher Shipmate
    Beyond words.
  • finelinefineline Kerygmania Host
    So sorry, Gamma. I don't know what to say, but I am praying a lot for you and Mrs G.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Shipmate, Hell Host
    {{{GG}}} I am so sorry. You and Mrs. G are in my frequent prayers.
  • Continuing to read and pray.
  • {{GG and Mrs GG}}

    God be with you both.

    However hard it may be, do please keep us posted, so that prayers may continue to ascend.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited December 2018
    ION, it seems that my brain tumour (successfully removed in 2016) might have damaged my pituitary gland to the extent that, not only do I have Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency, but also an underactive thyroid - possibly the cause of the muscle pain/weakness preventing me from walking properly (not to mention the general fatigue, depression etc. etc.)

    O goody - more blood tests (no problem), and more pills :yum: :yum:

    As the song says, the leg-bone's connected to the thigh-bone etc. etc., but it's odd (?) and certainly annoying (!) that the Big C, or its close relation, can cause problems/disability in an unlooked-for area.....

    This is, of course, relative - at least I'm still warm and upright (most of the time).
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    Bloody Hell BF!

    I thought I'd got beyond the child's cry of, "But it's notfair.

    I haven't, it isn't.
  • Ah well. It is what it is, and one takes each day (and its concomitant shite) as it comes.
  • Heck.

    There are layers and layers of this stuff.

    Mrs G's doddery old mum, who has dementia, has become convinced that her daughter passed away this weekend. Only to forget all about it 5 minutes later. Only to again become convinced ...

    Meanwhile, Mrs G' soldiers on and has opted not to continue with the chemo. She also wants to go into a hospice. There's a home visit tomorrow to make arrangements. The Gamalielettes are both home and disappointed that their mam isn't going to stay at home where they can help me look after her. She is protecting us, I think.

    Everyone is in bits, including the health professionals.
  • FWIW, GG, go with the hospice. IME, hospices (and their staff) are Gifts from God.

    Our local hospice is a truly blessed place.

    I can say no more, other than {{GG, family, and Mrs GG}}

  • Yes, much as it pains me to see her leave the house, the hospice is the best option.
  • Me and my mum looked after my dad at home. We managed just about 4 weeks before the task went beyond our capacity to cope (alternatively, realised that our capacity to cope was less than what was required).

    He was very well cared for in the hospice, and died three weeks later.

    Unless you've got locked-in cast-iron nursing care and on-call doctors, it's a very hard road to walk - and hospices know what they're doing. You can concentrate on being with her, and let the staff deal with the mundane side of the physical care. They will also care for you, if you wish it.
  • Much love from the Antipodes to you.
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