Cancer SUCKS

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  • So sorry Bishops Finger, not a glad memory to have indeed.
  • Thanks @Graven Image - and not something to be joked about IMHO.
  • Same with my mother, BF, and my heart was gladdened that her suffering was eased and her eternal reward expedited.

    I also watched a dear friend slowly suffocate from the effects of motor neurone disease ; she’d have died quicker and much more peacefully if she’d had adequate morphine. I think the hospice staff feared criticism for knocking her off.
  • PatdysPatdys Shipmate
    Quietly and regularly reading and digesting.
  • Dear Dr ___ _____,

    Was it really necessary for you to tell my contact in the peer support group that he only had eight months to live? You didn't know and you knew you didn't know, and you still don't know, and he's proved you wrong anyway.
  • :angry:
    I've just noticed that it's been over a month since the previous post on this thread!

    <<votives>> for all still suffering...
  • I continue to pray for all who have posted on this thread, and those known only to God who are suffering from this hellish disease.
  • PatdysPatdys Shipmate
    I quietly read and pray.
  • KyzylKyzyl Shipmate Posts: 27
    I check in regularly, just don't post. My cousins are both in a holding pattern at this time.
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    Today I take my last pill in drug cycle #37
    Which is 2 years 306 days of meds
    Which the average effectiveness of my drug is 22 months according to the company who manufacture it
    Which is pretty amazing!!!!
    Which is not to say there have not been some hellish times ... but I am still here.

    Indebted to all for ongoing support ; prayers, thoughts, candles of various hues and fragrances. prayers prayed at particular Shacks and Shrines, etc, etc
  • AmosAmos Shipmate
    I too check in and read and pray.
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    Very, very good, Galilit! May you enjoy joy and health in your continuing life. :heart:
  • {{{Galilit}}} <votive>
  • Always praying
  • Continue the prayer chain for all who have posted. Galilit thank you for the good news post, just this week I was wondering how you were doing.
  • Good to hear the news, Galilit! And extra points for a good news post down here. The encouragement fits nicely between all the prayers and curses. (The friend I mentioned a few posts back just called again sounding pretty excited too - the chemical warfare is working for him as well).
  • Yay for Pills and Chemicals that are working!
    :grin:
  • PatdysPatdys Shipmate
    Galilit

    Brilliant News!
    (And I note it has not all been sunshine and roses!)

  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    It has been a hard cycle, this one
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Joyful to read this news ((Galilit)). More flowers, more candles, more outpouring of gratitude.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    So pleased to hear your news, though sorry it’s been such a tough cycle.
    Continuing in prayer 🕯
  • KyzylKyzyl Shipmate Posts: 27
    I want to thank everyone for your prayers. My cousin Harry passed this morning at 630am EDT. Johnny is holding on bit it has been rough.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I'm so sorry, Kyzyl. Praying for you and your family and all of Harry's loved ones.
  • Sad to hear Kyzl. Prays for you in what must be very hard, and for all who care.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    🕯
  • I'm so sorry.
  • MaryLouiseMaryLouise Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    ((Kzyl))
  • PatdysPatdys Shipmate
    Quietly sitting and praying
  • SusanDorisSusanDoris Shipmate
    Another checking in - and so pleased to hear from you, Galilit. I was mentioning you only the other day when I heard of another who has to have breast lumps removed and recommending the local anaesthetic choice.

    And a cheer for medications that work.
  • HuiaHuia Shipmate
    I mentioned in the prayer thread that Kiri Allen, NZ's Civil Defence and Conservation Minister has been diagnosed with stage 3 cervical cancer. What I left out is my anger at discovering how far behind best practice in treating this NZ has fallen. This is particularly galling as the country has a shameful history in this area. In the late 1980s two feminists Sandra Coney and Philida Bunkle published an article about an "experiment" that was taking place at National Women's Hospital in Auckland where, unknown to the women involved, pre-cancerous smears weren't treated, but their progress was observed, which led to women dying unnecessarily. I remember it particularly because I was living in Wellington and had a couple of dodgy smears that were followed up and treated in a timely manner. I remember being relieved later that the doctors I consulted were ethical and that I lived in Wellington. There was a Judicial Inquiry into what was called "An Unfortunate Experiment" headed by Dame Sylvia Cartwright.

    I'm glad this thread is in Hell because it's given me a space to realise why I have been incandescent with rage all afternoon. It's taken me until now to put it all together.

    I'm still angry, but now I can work out how best to use that anger constructively instead of just seething helplessly.

    As Joe Hill said (in a different context), "Don't mourn, Organize."
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    edited April 6
    Yes, I remember the Judicial Inquiry. I have a friend whose Mum (a doctor herself) was diagnosed at that time ... and died. But my friend checked in the lists and her mother did get treatment in Auckland.
    I would also wonder if even Kiri Allan delayed her testing (and hence diagnosis) out of whakama [shame, embarrassment, self-doubt] like many women, especially Maori women.
    I am also happy not to be living in Aotearoa~New Zealand as I would have had to pay for my drug. (It was only approved to the Free List in April 2020, 2 years after I was diagnosed with breast cancer that had metastasized to my bones.)
  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Re delayed diagnosis, I wondered the same, myself

    It takes about 10 years to progress from abnormal result to invasive cancer particularly if the HPV ( human papillomavirus) is of subtypes 16 and 18

    The pap smear is now obsolete since late 2017 and has been replaced by CST ( cervical screening test) where each sample is checked for presence of HPV RNA; if that is positive then cells are looked at. The presence of HPV 16 or 18 demands early colposcopy ( a look at the cervix under a microscope) and biopsy
  • GalilitGalilit Shipmate
    There are a couple of scenarios played out (from both sides of the desk) re: Women's Troubles with Lady-Parts: "Well lets see if it continues; these things often sort themselves out, you know" or "Let's see if the same thing happens again next month, shall we?"

    Which of course you have been saying to yourself for the past 6 months or longer...

    [bit of a tangent, but you know...]

  • SojournerSojourner Shipmate
    Not in my workplace I can tell you

    Happy to say that young Maori women are not so shame-filled when they turn up ( and I see quite a few)

    Perhaps because of the aunts/ grandmas etc who have died of cervical cancer

    The uptake of teenage HPV vaccine in NZ approaches that of Oz ( 85% for girls, 80% for boys) whichbis heartening
  • HelenEvaHelenEva Shipmate
    My friend's cancer has spread. They are in their 40s and have a partner and two young children. Cancer sucks.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    Indeed it does! 🕯
  • KyzylKyzyl Shipmate Posts: 27
    HelenEva wrote: »
    My friend's cancer has spread. They are in their 40s and have a partner and two young children. Cancer sucks.

    Prayers ascending.
  • CathscatsCathscats Shipmate
    Praying.
    I have a dear friend in the States who has just had complete bone marrow replacement - from her own marrow harvested a while back - as the latest stage of her multiple myeloma treatment. She is now feeling vey rough indeed (though the medics are pleased with her progress). She knows that her life will not last more than a few years, but she is going through all this because she cannot bear the idea of having her elderly father have to grieve for her - she knows she will have to leave her (adult) children, but she wants her Dad to go before her.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    🕯
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Cathscats wrote: »
    Praying.
    I have a dear friend in the States who has just had complete bone marrow replacement - from her own marrow harvested a while back - as the latest stage of her multiple myeloma treatment. She is now feeling vey rough indeed (though the medics are pleased with her progress). She knows that her life will not last more than a few years, but she is going through all this because she cannot bear the idea of having her elderly father have to grieve for her - she knows she will have to leave her (adult) children, but she wants her Dad to go before her.

    This will likely give her remission of between 1 and 4 years. But there are treatments available beyond that. Mr F is on 4 years+ on a particular regime.
  • Praying for your friends @Cathscats

    My father was too old for bone marrow treatment when he was diagnosed with myeloma in August / September 2014. He's had four different chemo regimes since then, although he ran out of options last September.

    The treatment for myeloma seems to be improving all the time, even in the six years since Dad was diagnosed.
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